Wearable

  • COMPAMED 2016 connected medical devices and people

    Materialise NV from Belgium speaking on “Innovation in 3D Printed Wearables” at COMPAMED HIGH-TECH Forum 2016. IVAM

    Miniaturized connected systems and outstanding business contacts: forming networks on both technical and business level was one of the key features of COMPAMED 2016, the international trade fair for suppliers and manufacturers of medical technologies. This trend was visible at and enhanced by the joint trade fair booth of the IVAM Microtechnology Network in hall 8a, the accompanying presentation forum and numerous B2B meetings between companies from Germany and Japan.

  • Computer in der Jacke, in der Brille und auf der Haut

    Leuchtende Fasern erzeugen wechselnde Tartan-Webmuster auf dem Kleidungsstück Bild: L. Fraguada/E. Bigger

    Computer sind ein wichtiges Werkzeug im Alltag, sei es als PC oder als Smartphone. In Zukunft werden sie zunehmend mit den Alltagsgegenständen verschmelzen und von dort aus den Nutzer unterstützen, etwa als Smartwatch, Displaybrillen, Sensorkleidung und vieles mehr. Über diesen Trend der Digitalisierung tauschen sich Wissenschaftler, Unternehmer, Modedesigner und Nutzer auf der vom KIT mitorganisierten Konferenz ISWC/UBICOMP vom 12. bis 16. September 2016 in Heidelberg aus. Vertreter der Medien sind herzlich eingeladen. Anmeldung bitte mit beigefügtem Formular oder per E-Mail.

  • DFKI and Hitachi jointly develop AI technology for human activity recognition of workers

    Workflow of human activity recognition. Hitachi

    ...using wearable devices. With view to utilizing AI to assist operations and prevent human error in manufacturing. Germany and Japan, March 8, 2017 - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz (German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, “DFKI“) and Hitachi, Ltd. (Hitachi) today announced the joint development of AI (artificial intelligence) technology for human activity recongnition of workers using wearable devices. The AI technology performs real-time recognition of workers’ activities by integrating technology in eye-tracking glasses (1) to recognize gazed objects with technology in armband devices to recognize action. The recognition ability of each activity is achieved by having the AI understand the tools or parts used at the production site as well as anticipated actions through Deep Learning (2). DFKI and Hitachi will use this newly developed AI technology to assist operations and prevent human error, to contribute to enhancing quality and efficiency on the front line of manufacturing.

  • Electron Beam Patterning for High-resolution Full-color OLED Displays

    Probe station with patterned OLEDs in the clean room of Fraunhofer FEP. © Fraunhofer FEP

    OLED microdisplays are increasingly establishing themselves in wearables and data glasses. In order to meet the requirements for higher efficiency, higher contrast, and higher resolutions in these applications, Fraunhofer FEP scientists have developed a new micropatterning approach for OLEDs on silicon substrates. This might eliminate the use of color filters and shadow masks in the future and allow full-color displays to be developed by means of a new process.

  • Flexible Organic Electronics for Wearables

    Bracelet with flexible OLED © LYTEUS

    Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, presents first wearable OLED bracelet at Wearable Europe 2018, from April 11th to 12th in Berlin, Germany at booth no. P12 together with VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and Holst Centre from Netherlands.

  • Fusible and Printable Elastomer Sensors for e-textiles

    Sensor patterns and conducting paths printed on polyester textile. © K. Selsam for Fraunhofer ISC

    Integrating sensoric functions into textiles or elastomers is way more difficult than equipping machines because it requires movable or extensible sensors. The Center Smart Materials CeSMa of the Fraunhofer ISC with its experience in the field of adaptive elastomers has developed highly elastic sensors and actuators based on silicone. They provide a wide range of sensoric and actoric functions for smart electronic textiles (e-textiles) with a broad application potential in medical technology, in sports, in furniture, vehicles or in transport safety. CeSMa will be presenting its developments from May 14-17 at TechTextil 2019 in Frankfurt.

  • Hannover Messe: Low Haze Structures for Transparent Flexible Electrodes by Electrospinning Processes

    Electrospinning: thin fibers for flexible, transparent electrodes. Source: Use Bellhäuser

    Flexible, transparent, and conductive electrodes (FTCEs) are a key enabling technology for the new generation of flexible, printable and wearable electronics. The touchscreens and displays of the future will be curved and flexible and integrated into cars, phones, or medical technology. Tapping and wiping can only work on flexible devices, when flexible materials are used for touchscreens and electric circuits, but not brittle materials like indium tin oxide or silicon. For this purpose, INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials is working with the process of electrospinning, a technique that produces ultra-fine fibers that are up to 100 times thinner than a human hair.

  • Healthy Hiking in Smart Socks

    Markus Hill (right), research assistantand, and textile producer Thomas Lindner check the sensors in the smart sock. Wolfgang Schmidt

    Researchers of the Chemnitz University of Technology develop tough electronic for sport and medical science. Often, a one-sided weight loading is the reason for hurting feet. But only few notice while walking. That is where the “Smart Sock”, developed by the Professorship of Sports Equipment and Technology of the Chemnitz University of Technology and in cooperation with the textile producer Lindner from Hohenstein-Ernstthal, starts: “The at the University developed electronic of the sock measures the pressure distribution and acceleration on the foot. This way, conclusions from parameters such as one-sided weight loading can be drawn”, Prof. Dr. Stephan Odenwald explains.

  • Large, but nevertheless micro – high resolution OLED microdisplay for virtual reality applications

    Test and qualification vehicle of the LOMID chip with a screen diagonal of 2.5 cm and a resolution of 1920 × 1200 (WUXGA) © Fraunhofer FEP, Photographer: Jürgen Lösel

    Fraunhofer FEP will present a new generation of OLED microdisplays at the SID-Mid-Europe Chapter Spring Meeting, running from 13th to 14th of March 2017 in Dresden. The conference will focus on “Wearable and Projection Displays”. A number of top-level and interesting speakers will give talks on markets, technologies, systems and applications in the fields of micro and small area display technologies.

    With applications ranging from gaming to professional uses such for assembly, maintenance information supply, and pilot training in flight simulators, virtual reality glasses and their supporting systems are becoming more and more established, whilst at the same time also initiating and facilitating developments in new fields. A crucial aspect of virtual reality presentations is the display technology. Here, OLED microdisplays are receiving growing attention due to their technological advantages.

  • Light from a Roll – Hybrid OLED Creates Innovative and Functional Luminous Surfaces

    Prototypes of the eyecatcher motorcycle jacket with luminous integrated flexible OLEDs at LOPEC 2019. © EMDE development of light GmbH

    Up to now, OLEDs have been used exclusively as a novel lighting technology for use in luminaires and lamps. However, flexible organic technology can offer much more: as an active lighting surface, it can be combined with a wide variety of materials, not just to modify but to revolutionize the functionality and design of countless existing products. To exemplify this, the Fraunhofer FEP together with the company EMDE development of light GmbH will be presenting hybrid flexible OLEDs integrated into textile designs within the EU-funded project PI-SCALE for the first time at LOPEC (March 19-21, 2019 in Munich, Germany) as examples of some of the many possible applications.

  • Low haze structures for transparent flexible electrodes by electrospinning processes

    When conductive materials are spun, flexible conductive transparent electrodes could be produced. Source: Bellhäuser

    For flexible electrodes INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials is working with the process of electrospinning, a technique that produces ultra-fine fibers that are up to 100 times thinner than a human hair. When conductive materials are spun, flexible conductive transparent electrodes could be produced. These FTCEs have transparencies comparable to indium tin oxide with low haze less than two percent.

    Flexible, transparent, and conductive electrodes (FTCE) are a key enabling technology for the new generation of flexible, printable and wearable electronics. The touchscreens and displays of the future will be curved and flexible and integrated into cars, phones, or medical technology.

  • New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

    NanEye - The award winning, smallest digital camera in the world, for disposable endoscope. CMOSIS Germany GmbH

    COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

  • Nylon as a Building Block for Transparent Electronic Devices?

    Transparent nylon could be an important building block for the development of transparent electronic circuits in the future. © MPI-P

    Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) led by Dr. Kamal Asadi have solved a four decade long challenge of producing very thin nylon films that can be used for instance in electronic memory components. The thin nylon films are several 100 times thinner than human hair and could thus be attractive for applications in bendable electronic devices or for electronics in clothing.

  • OLED Integration in Textiles: Functional and Eye-catching

    O-BUTTON, customer-specific OLED elements for textile integration. © Fraunhofer FEP, Photograph: Jan Hesse

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) are mainly known from televisions and smartphone displays. They can be used as lighting objects in car tail lights or lights. The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP as a partner for customer-specific OLED development and production is now presenting OLED elements that can be integrated into textiles at the Electronics System Integration Technology Conference ESTC 2018 from September 18 - 21, 2018 in Dresden at booth no. 29.

  • OLED microdisplays in data glasses for improved human-machine interaction

    Interactive smart eye-glasses using bi-directional OLED microdisplays Jürgen Lösel

    The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP has been developing various applications for OLED microdisplays based on organic semiconductors. By integrating the capabilities of an image sensor directly into the microdisplay, eye movements can be recorded by the smart glasses and utilized for guidance and control functions, as one example. The new design will be debuted at Augmented World Expo Europe (AWE) in Berlin at Booth B25, October 18th – 19th.

  • OLEDs Applied to Paper-Thin Stainless Steel

    OLED on stainless steel. © Fraunhofer FEP

    Stainless steel is normally associated with kitchenware and chemical Plant pipe. However, stainless steel foil has also been utilized for several years in thin-film photovoltaics and batteries. Now stainless steel can also serve as a substrate for flexible electronic components. Fraunhofer Institute FEP will be presenting OLEDs on gauzy stainless steel foil during aimcal 2017 in Tampa/ USA, from October 15 – 18, 2017. The novel application on display in Booth 22 was developed in cooperation with the Nippon Steel & Sumikin Materials Co., Ltd. (NSMAT) and Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation (NSSMC).

  • Photonics West 2017: Smart systems and production processes for large-scale optics manufacturing

    The simulation shows in real time how the blank conforms to the shape of the tools that are pressing it and how the lens then slowly cools.  Source: Fraunhofer IPT

    When manufacturing optical lenses, every detail counts. In order to increrase stability of manufacturing processes while making them faster and more cost-efficient at the same time, Fraunhofer researchers are developing tools and production processes for optical elements of new glass materials. At the Photonics West trade fair in San Francisco from January 28 to February 2, 2017, Fraunhofer experts will be showing how Industry 4.0 approaches can improve the development and manufacture of glass optics and how companies in the optics market can profit from new techonologies and digital tools, like simulations on smart glasses or tablets.

  • Photovoltaics: Easy Implementation Thanks to Modern Printing Techniques

    The printed stripes make all the difference. By series connection, each square of ten stripes is capable of producing a voltage of about 8 Volt. © Fraunhofer IAP

    Imagine a jacket that produces enough electricity to charge your mobile phone. Imagine a jacket that does not only reflect, but light up itself when you ride your bike in the dark. Innovative printing solutions make future happen today. The Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP presents different prototypes from photovoltaics research projects at the international exhibition and conference for the printed electronics industry LOPEC 2018 in Munich, March 13 to 15. First projects resulting from the German OLED Technology Alliance (GOTA) are being presented as well.

    Fraunhofer IAP at LOPEC: Hall B0 Booth 207

  • Simulation tool for efficient production of non-woven fabrics

    High-tech material non-woven: Project manager Dr. Simone Gramsch has developed the simulation tool FIDYST with her team. Fraunhofer ITWM

    Non-woven fabrics are indispensable to everyday life. A Fraunhofer Institute has developed software that makes the production of non-woven products much more efficient and flexible. With the tool FIDYST, it has been possible for the first time to simulate the movement of fibers in turbulent air currents. A real innovation – and the breakthrough in a theory that is over a hundred years old.