Printed electronics

Printed electronics are printing methods used to create thin and flexible electrical devices on flat surfaces. This is done by printing layers of fluid functional materials, such as special plastic, fluids and pastes on a thin and flexible film.

Applications of said methods include television screens, smartphones, many kind touch screens, optical display’s, medical devices, lighting and sensors among others.

  • Ahead of the Curve

    CurveUps are flat materials that transform themselves through material forces into the desired 3D object. IST Austria

    CurveUps: IST Austria computer scientists design flat sheets that transform themselves into smooth-surfaced, free-form objects. Their new method will be presented at this year’s prestigious “SIGGRAPH” conference.

    3D printers have been around since the 1980s, but we are still far from maximizing their potential. One active area of research and development is “self-actuating” objects: flat materials that transform themselves through material forces into the desired 3D object. Previously, however, the range of objects was limited to those with sharp edges and little, if any, curvature, and the transformation methods were based primarily on folding or processes that could not be controlled very precisely (e.g. chemical reactions or inflation).

  • Batterie und Elektronik aus dem Tintenstrahldrucker

    Batterie und Elektronik aus dem Tintenstrahldrucker | Schaltkreise aus dem Tintenstrahldrucker sind so flexibel wie das Papier auf dem sie gedruckt sind.

    Der südkoreanischer Forscher Sang-Young Lee hat einen handelsüblichen Drucker so umgebaut, dass er Energiespeicher und einfache Schaltkreise druckt. Ziel dabei ist, tragbare Technik unsichtbar in beliebigen Bauformen zu integrieren.

    Unter einem Tisch im Labor von Sang-Young Lee befindet sich ein normaler, etwas abgenutzter Tintenstrahldrucker, den er so modifiziert hat, dass er elektronische Schaltkreise und Superkondensatoren produziert. Dazu entleert Lee die Tintenbehälter und befüllt sie mit speziellen Batterie-Materialien und leitfähiger Tinte. Auf behandeltem Papier druckt das Gerät dann flexible, haltbare Superkondensatoren und einfache Schaltkreis-Komponenten, zum Beispiel in Form einer hochaufgelösten Karte der Republik Korea, Blumen oder Logos.

  • Fraunhofer IWS scientists are now able to offer n-conductive polymers as processable paste

    Printed TEG (thermoelectric generator) made of p- and n-conductive polymer and silver contact © Fraunhofer IWS Dresden

    The Fraunhofer IWS has made another important step forward with respect to the research on n-conductive polymers for printed electronics. The Dresden scientists succeeded in modifying an n-conductive polymer, already synthesized in 2015, in such a way that it can now be processed as a paste and be printed in a three-dimensional manner.

  • Hannover Messe: New hybrid inks for printed, flexible electronics without sintering

    New type of hybrid inks  allow electronic circuits to be applied to paper directly from a pen. Source: INM

    Research scientists at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have now developed a new type of hybrid inks which allows electronic circuits to be applied to paper directly from a pen, for example. Flexible circuits can be produced inexpensively on foil or paper using printing processes and permit futuristic designs with curved diodes or input elements. This requires printable electronic materials that retain a high level of conductivity during usage in spite of their curved surfaces. Research scientists at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have now developed a new type of hybrid inks which allows electronic circuits to be applied to paper directly from a pen, for example. They are usable after drying without any further processing.

  • High Resolution Laser Structuring of Thin Films at LOPEC 2017

    Laser ablation of ITO on flexible PET substrate. Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany.

    Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will present laser processes for micro structuring of thin films at LOPEC 2017, trade fair for printed electronics in Munich, Germany. Innovative solutions for application fields like photovoltaics and thin film processing will be shown at COPT.NRW joint stand 405, hall B0, from March 29 to 30.

  • High-performance Roll-to-Roll processing for flexible electronics

    Ultra-thin flexible Corning® Willow® Glass with a glass thickness of 100 μm © Fraunhofer FEP, Photographer: Jürgen Lösel

    Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP as one of the leading partners for research and development for surface technologies and organic electronics presents a roll of flexible thin glass, which is coated with highly conductive ITO continuously on 100 meters with roll-to-roll technology for the first time at FLEX 2017, from June 19 – 22, 2017 in Monterey, USA at booth no. 1004.

  • Meilenstein in der gedruckten Photovoltaik-Technologie

    FAU-Wissenschaftler erforschen effiziente und nachhaltige organische Solarzellen als Alternative zu herkömmlichen Siliziumzellen

  • Modular OLED Light Strips

    OLED luminous strips enable luminous surfaces with segmented control - stripe with segmented control. © Fraunhofer FEP

    At the International Symposium on Automotive Lighting 2019 (ISAL) in Darmstadt from September 23 to 25, 2019, the Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, will present OLED light strips of any length with additional functionalities for the first time at booth no. 37.

  • New Technology for Ultra-smooth Polymer Films

    Flexible film substrate of 1.25 meter width at the roll-to-roll coating line „atmoFlex 1250”. © Fraunfofer FEP

    The Fraunhofer FEP has succeeded in developing a new technology for the production of ultra-smooth polymer films as part of the "OptiPerm" project. This project received funding from the European Union and the Saxony State Ministry of Economics, Labor and Transport (grant agreement no. 3000651169).

  • OLED production facility from a single source

    Pilot plant for printed organic electronics at the Fraunhofer IAP in Potsdam-Golm. © Fraunhofer IAP, photo: Till Budde

    The Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP in Potsdam and three other German companies have been commissioned by a Chinese producer to develop an OLED production facility for its site in China. The four development partners have formed the consortium GOTA - German OLED Technology Alliance – in order to develop, under one roof, the materials and technologies needed for printed electronics and machine engineering. The Fraunhofer IAP will present its know-how in the field of printed electronics at LOPEC, the international exhibition for printed electronics, which will be held in Munich from March 29 – 30, 2017.

  • Paving the way for a sounding photo book

    Dr. Georg Schmidt (left) and student Robert Eland check the quality of a test print at a roll-to-roll printing press in a laboratory of the Professorship of Printed Media Technology. Chemnitz University/Uwe Meinhold

    The Institute for Print and Media Technology at the Chemnitz University of Technology strives to reach the mass market with the printing of paper-speakers.

    If the Institute for Print and Media Technology at the Chemnitz University of Technology succeeds, the speaker of the future will be thin as paper and make photo books and packaging sound. In the laboratories of the Chemnitz researchers this is almost real as they already developed the numerously awarded “T-Book” – a large-scale photo book equipped with printed electronic – in 2015.

  • Selbstorganisierende Nano-Tinten bilden durch Stempeldruck leitfähige und transparente Gitter

    Selbstorganisierende Nano Tinten bilden durch Stempeldruck leitfähige und transparente Gitter | Leitfähige und transparente Gitterstrukturen durch Stempeldruck mit selbstorganisierenden Nano-Tinten. Image: INM

    Transparente Elektronik findet sich heute zum Beispiel in Dünnschicht-Displays, Solarzellen und Touchscreens. Zunehmend ist Elektronik auch auf biegsamen Oberflächen von Interesse. Das erfordert druckbare Materialien, die transparent sind und deren Leitfähigkeit auch bei Verformung hoch bleibt. Dafür haben Forscher des INM – Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien eine neue selbstorganisierende Nano-Tinte mit einem Stempeldruckverfahren kombiniert. Damit stellten sie Gitterstrukturen her, deren Strukturbreiten unter einem Mikrometer liegen.