Physics

Physics is the study of science that deals with matter, energy, motion, and force through time and space. 
Physics in nanotechnology embodies segments such as quantum computing, laser technology, photonics as some examples.

  • Controlling Quantum States Atom by Atom

    Controlling Quantum States Atom by Atom | Using the tip of a scanning tunnel microscope, a single xenon atom (yellow) is being moved from a quantum box (blue), thus specifically altering its electronic quantum state. (Image: University of Basel, Department of Physics)

    An international consortium led by researchers at the University of Basel has developed a method to precisely alter the quantum mechanical states of electrons within an array of quantum boxes. The method can be used to investigate the interactions between various types of atoms and electrons, which is essential for future quantum technologies, as the group reports in the journal Small.

  • Controlling Thermal and Particle Currents by Quantum Observation

    Artistic illustration of the role of a quantum observer in a nanodevice. © K. Aranburu

    Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. Measurement plays a fundamental role in quantum mechanics. At the same time, it also constitutes one of the main problems regarding the interpretation of this whole field. The best-known illustration of the principles of superposition and entanglement is Schrödinger’s cat. Not being visible from the outside, the cat resides in a coherent superposition of two states: it is alive and dead at the same time.

  • Converts One-third of the Sunlight into Electricity: 33.3 % Silicon-based Multi-junction Solar Cell

    Silicon-based multi-junction solar cell consisting of III-V semiconductors and silicon. The record cell converts 33.3. percent of the incident sunlight into electricity. © Fraunhofer ISE/Photo: Dirk Mahler

    Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE together with the company EV Group (EVG) have developed a new silicon-based multi-junction solar cell, which can convert exactly one-third of the incident sunlight into useful electricity. This newest result is now published in the renowned scientific magazine Nature Energy.

  • Conveyor Technology: Moving Large Quantities of Small Goods Using Muscles Made of Silicone Polymer

    Prof. Stefan Seelecke (l.) and Steffen Hau will be exhibiting a model of their vibrating conveyor system at Hannover Messe. Credit: Oliver Dietze

    Using artificial-muscle actuators, Stefan Seelecke and his team of engineers at Saarland University have developed a new self-optimizing conveyor technology that adapts itself to the size, weight and desired speed of the materials being conveyed. The technology makes use of silicone polymer-based artificial muscles to transport dry bulk materials of all kinds, from foodstuffs to small metal components. By exploiting the properties of electromechanically active polymers, the Saarbrücken research team has built an actuator that they install at intervals below the conveyor belt.

  • Copper Compound as Promising Quantum Computing Unit

    Jena doctoral student Benjamin Kintzel looks at a laboratory vessel containing crystals of a novel molecule that may possibly be used in a quantum computer. Photo: Jan-Peter Kasper/FSU

     

    Quantum computers could vastly increase the capabilities of IT systems, bringing major changes worldwide. However, there is still a long way to go before such a device can actually be constructed, because it has not yet been possible to transfer existing molecular concepts into technologies in a practical way. This has not kept researchers around the world away from developing and optimising new ideas for individual components. Chemists at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Germany) have now synthesised a molecule that can perform the function of a computing unit in a quantum computer. They report on their work in the current issue of the research journal ‘Chemical Communications’.

  • Corrective glass for mass spectrometry imaging

    Custom-built laser source for mass spectrometry imaging: By means of the improved LAESI technique the surface of this coarse piece of savoy cabbage can now be chemically analyzed. Benjamin Bartels / Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology

    Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have now improved mass spectrometry imaging in such a way that the distribution of molecules can also be visualized on rippled, hairy, bulgy or coarse surfaces. The source of the laser-based technique was custom-built to accommodate the topography of non-flat samples. By employing a distances sensor, a height profile of the surface is recorded before the actual chemical imaging. The new tool can be used for answering ecological questions from a new perspective.

  • Cost efficient Diode Lasers for Industrial Applications

    The »Brilliant Industrial Diode Lasers« (BRIDLE) project has been finished successfully after 42 months of intense research activities. BRIDLE was made possible by funding from the European Commission. The seven project partners finished their work at the end of February 2016. The project was coordinated by »DILAS Diodenlaser GmbH« (Germany), the project partners are located in Germany, UK, Switzerland, France and Finland. BRIDLE targeted a major increase in the brightness achievable in direct diode laser systems, based on advances in diode laser and beam -combining technology. Throughout, the highest conversion was sought as was compatibility with low cost, volume manufacture.

  • Countdown to the space mission “Solar Orbiter”: Measuring instruments from Kiel start their voyage

    The three sensors from Kiel are ready for space: EPT-HET1 and 2 on the left, and STEP on the right. Photo/Copyright: Jürgen Haacks, CAU

    Around five years ago, a team led by a physicist from Kiel University, Professor Robert Wimmer-Schweingruber, won the coveted tender for providing instruments to be placed on board the “Solar Orbiter” space probe. This joint mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the US space agency NASA is expected to launch in October 2018, and will go closer to the sun than has ever been done before. Now, exactly on schedule, the preparations in Kiel for this mission are entering their final phase. On Monday 21 November the flight instruments from Kiel will be handed over to the space probe installation team in England.

  • Coupling a Nano-trumpet With a Quantum Dot Enables Precise Position Determination

    Trumpet-shaped nanowires with a length of about 10 micrometers are coupled to quantum dots located at their bases. Grenoble Alps University

    Scientists from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the University of Basel have succeeded in coupling an extremely small quantum dot with 1,000 times larger trumpet-shaped nanowire. The movement of the nanowire can be detected with a sensitivity of 100 femtometers via the wavelength of the light emitted by the quantum dot. Conversely, the oscillation of the nanowire can be influenced by excitation of the quantum dot with a laser. Nature Communications published the results.

  • Cryo-force Spectroscopy Reveals the Mechanical Properties of DNA Components

    At low temperatures, a DNA strand is removed from the gold surface using the tip of an atomic force microscope. In the process, physical parameters can be determined. Image: University of Basel, Department of Physics

    Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. With a combination of cryo-force spectroscopy and computer simulations, they were able to show that DNA molecules behave like a chain of small coil springs. The researchers reported their findings in Nature Communications.

  • Crystals for Superconduction, Quantum Computing and High Efficiency Solar Cells

    Crystals have applications in a wide variety of fields. Photo of a multicrystalline silicon wafer, which serves as the basis of a solar cell.  ©Fraunhofer ISE

    From March 8-10, 2017, an International Conference on Crystal Growth is to be held in Freiburg under the auspices of the German Association of Crystal Growth DGKK and the Swiss Society for Crystallography SGK-SSCR. The conference, jointly organized by the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, the Crystallography department of the Institute of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University Freiburg and the University of Geneva, is to be held in the seminar rooms of the Chemistry Faculty of the University of Freiburg. Furthermore, the Young DGKK will hold a seminar for young scientists at Fraunhofer ISE on March 7, 2017.

  • Data Storage Using Individual Molecules

    Graphic animation of a possible data memory on the atomic scale: A data storage element - consisting of only 6 xenon atoms - is liquefied by a voltage pulse. Universität Basel, Departement of Physics

    Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal ‘small’, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

  • Dauerbetrieb der Tokamaks rückt näher

    Aussichtsreiche Experimente in ASDEX Upgrade / Bedingungen für ITER und DEMO nahezu erfüllt

  • Der Quanten-Strom im Graphen

    Wenn der Strom in Portionen fließt: Berechnungen der TU Wien liefern Erkenntnisse über die Quanten-Eigenschaften des Kohlenstoff-Materials Graphen.

  • Describing the Behaviour of Electrons Under Extreme Conditions for the First Time

    In nature, the hot, dense matter of electron gas occurs inside planets, such as here in Jupiter. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gabriel Fiset

    Electrons are an elementary component of our world: they surround the core of all atoms, are essential to the formation of molecules, and primarily determine the properties of solids and liquids. They are also the charge carriers of electrical current, without which our high-tech environment with smartphones, computers and even the traditional light bulb would not be conceivable. In spite of their omnipresence in everyday life, we have not yet been able to accurately describe the behaviour of interacting electrons - only approximate it in models - especially at extreme temperatures and densities, such as inside planets or in stars.

  • Designing Nanocrystals for More Efficient Optoelectronics

    The luminescent atoms in the image show a nanocrystal which is characterized with atomistic resolution, including its interface chemistry. experimental and theoretical approaches. Published with permission by Nature Publishing Group. Copyright: Peter Allen

     

    New artificial materials for semiconductors used in solar cells or photoelectrochemical cells that are designed from scratch with totally new and tailored properties: this is the latest research topic of Stefan Wippermann, head of the group “Atomistic Modelling“ at the Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung), and his team. They characterized for the first time with atomic resolution a typical material system and are able to set design principles.

  • Detailreiche Bilder eines planetaren Embryos zeigen Turboversion der Planetenentstehung

    Beobachtungen mit dem Radioteleskop VLA in New Mexico zeigen die inneren Partien der Planeten-Geburtsstätte rund um den jungen Stern HL Tauri so detailreich wie nie zuvor. Deutlich sichtbar ist dabei ein riesiger Staubklumpen mit dem drei- bis achtfachen der Erdmasse, der ideale Bedingungen für die Entstehung eines Planeten bietet. Die Masse des neuen Planeten dürfte zwischen jener der Erde und jener des Neptun liegen. Das Vorhandensein des Klumpens zeigt eine Lösung für ein grundlegendes Problem der Planetenentstehung auf: wie Planeten innerhalb der relativ kurzen Zeit entstehen können, die für ihr Wachstum zur Verfügung steht.

  • Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft awards Technology Transfer Prize to Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

    The DGP awards the Technology Transfer Prize 2017/2018 jointly to  Nanoscribe GmbH, as well as the Institute for Nanotechnology and Innovation and Relation Management of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). © DPG 2016

    The DPG Technology Transfer Prize 2017/2018 will be awarded jointly to Nanoscribe GmbH, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, and the Institute for Nanotechnology and Innovation and Relation Management at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The three institutions received the award for the outstanding transfer of scientific findings in the field of 3D laser lithography into commercial exploitation - in particular for the fabrication of micro- and nanostructures.

  • Devarnishing by electron beam

    The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP will be exhibiting its electron beam technology as an alternative beam tool for devarnishing at the parts2clean trade show in Stuttgart, from May 31st to June 2nd, 2016 at the joint booth of the Fraunhofer Cleaning Technology Alliance, Hall 7, Booth B41.

  • Developing Reliable Quantum Computers

    Illustration: Quantum Optics and Statistics, University of Freiburg

    International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems. Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to ensure it is working reliably? Depending on the algorithmic task, this could be an easy or a very difficult certification problem.