Physics

Physics is the study of science that deals with matter, energy, motion, and force through time and space. 
Physics in nanotechnology embodies segments such as quantum computing, laser technology, photonics as some examples.

  • Europäisches Riesenteleskop erhält modernsten Spektrografen

    Astrophysiker der Universität Göttingen sind an der Planung und Entwicklung eines modernen Vielkanal-Spektrografen für das europäische Riesenteleskop E-ELT beteiligt. Das European Extremely Large Telescope wird derzeit in Chile gebaut und mit einem Hauptspiegeldurchmesser von 39 Metern das größte optische Teleskop der Welt.

  • European XFEL prepares for user operation: Researchers can hand in first proposals for experiments

    The FXE instrument, which is currently being assembled in its hutch in the European XFEL experiment hall, will enable studies of ultrafast processes such as decisive intermediate steps of chemical reactions. The X-ray laser flashes enter the instrument from the right side of the picture and travel through a series of complex optics and diagnostics before arriving at the sample interaction region. A yellow robot arm for one of the instrument's detectors is seen in the background to the left. European XFEL

    For the first time, scientists from around the world can now submit their proposals for experiments at the European XFEL. The international science facility in the Hamburg metropolitan region published the first call for applications for “beamtime” on its website. The user programme is expected to begin in the second half of the year, with two of the planned six instruments being initially available.

  • Evaluating Risk of Hydrogen Embrittlement: New Simulation of Cold Cracks in High-strength Steels

    Light microscopy image of a welded connection’s weld structure. © Fraunhofer IWM

    High-strength steels play a vital role in the construction of modern vehicles and machines. If these steels are welded during the production of components, mobile hydrogen atoms can cause problems within the material: the atoms accumulate slowly at highly stressed areas of a component, resulting in the steel becoming brittle at these locations. This can result in so-called cold break formations which can lead to component failure. Dr. Frank Schweizer of the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM has developed a simulation method with which component manufacturers can assess cold break tendencies and adjust their production accordingly.

  • Evidence of the Higgs Particle's Decay in Quarks

    The illustration shows an event that could be the sought-after decay of the Higgs particle in quarks. Illustration: ATLAS collaboration

    Research group at the University of Freiburg contribute significant new findings to the ATLAS experiment.

    As part of the ATLAS collaboration, the Freiburg research group led by Prof. Dr. Karl Jakobs and Dr. Christian Weiser has contributed to finding strong evidence that, among other things, the Higgs particle decays into quarks. The researchers analyzed data sets that were recorded in 2015 and 2016 with the ATLAS detector at the world’s largest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland.

  • Exotic Quantum States Made from Light: Physicists Create Optical “Wells” for a Super-Photon

    Potential wells The artist's rendering shows how potential wells are created for the light in the microresonator through heating with an external laser beam (green). © Photo: David Dung/Uni Bonn

    Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

  • Exotischer Materiezustand: "Flüssige" Quantenspins bei tiefsten Temperaturen beobachtet

    Exotischer Materiezustand Flüssige Quantenspins bei tiefsten Temperaturen beobachtet | Im Kristallgitter von Kalzium-Chrom-Oxid gibt es sowohl ferromagnetische Wechselwirkungen (grüne und rote Balken) als auch antiferromagnetische (blaue Balken). Abbildung: HZB

    Ein Team am HZB hat experimentell eine sogenannte Quanten-Spinflüssigkeit in einem Einkristall aus Kalzium-Chrom-Oxid nachgewiesen. Dabei handelt es sich um einen neuartigen Materiezustand. Das Besondere an dieser Entdeckung: Nach gängigen Vorstellungen war das Quantenphänomen in diesem Material gar nicht möglich. Nun liegt eine Erklärung vor. Die Arbeit erweitert das Verständnis von kondensierter Materie und könnte auch für die zukünftige Entwicklung von Quantencomputern von Bedeutung sein. Die Ergebnisse sind nun in Nature Physics veröffentlicht.

  • Explanation for Puzzling Quantum Oscillations has been Found

    Ball bouncing chaotically in a stadium (top). If it starts near an unstable trajectory, it remains close to this trajectory for some time but eventually escapes (bottom). IST Austria/Maksym Serbyn

    So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics. Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a quantum simulator.

  • Exploring the Phenomenon of Superconductivity

    Types of pairing of two fermions. Figure: Puneet Murthy

    Fermions in flatland pair up at very high temperatures: Using ultracold atoms, researchers at Heidelberg University have found an exotic state of matter where the constituent particles pair up when limited to two dimensions. The findings from the field of quantum physics may hold important clues to intriguing phenomena of superconductivity. The results were published in Science magazine.

  • Faculty of Engineering is doing research for the energy transition

    Marius Langwasser, Marco Liserre and Giovanni De Carne work at the Chair of Power Electronics on the ENSURE research project.  Raissa Nickel/CAU

    600,000 Euro project started at Kiel University
    Nicolaus Copernicus established a new world view in the 16th century. Suddenly, the earth was no longer the centre of the universe. Similarly, the energy transition represents a paradigm shift for our society, not only nationally, as Federal Minister of Education and Research, Johanna Wanka emphasised on the occasion of the Climate Change Conference in Paris in 2015: “It could establish itself internationally as the guiding principle for ending our use of energy produced from fossil fuels.”

  • Faster from the Laboratory to the Patient

    Partners of the POC-Iniative.

    In the development of new medications and medical engineering, there is a gap between the discovery of new potential active ingredients and products and their further development into medicinal products and medical devices by the industry. The Helmholtz Association and the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, together with the Deutsche Hochschulmedizin, have now jointly brought the Proof-of-Concept initiative into being. It promotes the translation of innovative, promising research projects.

  • Faster, More Precise, More Stable: Study Optimizes Graphene Growth

    Visible to the naked eye: A wafer-thin graphene flake obtained via chemical vapor deposition. The red coloration of the copper substrate appears when the sample is heated in air. (Photo: J. Kraus/ TUM)

    Each atomic layer thin, tear-resistant, and stable. Graphene is seen as the material of the future. It is ideal for e.g. producing ultra-light electronics or highly stable mechanical components. But the wafer-thin carbon layers are difficult to produce. At the Technical University of Munich (TUM), Jürgen Kraus has manufactured self-supporting graphene membranes, and at the same time systematically investigated and optimized the growth of the graphene crystals. He was awarded the Evonik Research Prize for his work.

  • Fiber-based Quantum Communication - Interference of Photons Using Remote Sources

    Emission of single photons stemming from remote quantum dots. The wavelength of the single photons is manipulated by mixing them with strong laser fields within small crystals. University of Stuttgart/Kolatschek

    Scientists are working on the totally bug-proof communication – the so-called quantum communication. Current approaches for long-distance signal transmission rely on repeaters which are based on a crucial effect, the interference of two photons, that is, two individual light quanta coming from distant sources. Physicists from University of Stuttgart and Saarland University, in Germany, were now able to manipulate the single photons by means of small crystals without compromising their quantum mechanical nature. This manipulation is necessary to transmit the signal via optical fibers which may enable a large-area quantum network. The results were now published in Nature Nanotechnology.

  • Fine Felted Nanotubes: CAU Research Team Develops New Composite Material Made of Carbon Nanotubes

    In this new process, the tiny, thread-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arrange themselves - almost like felting - to form a stable, tear-resistant layer. Fabian Schütt

    Due to their unique properties, carbon nanotubes would be ideal for numerous applications, from ultra-lightweight batteries to high-performance plastics, right through to medical implants. But they either cannot be combined adequately with other materials, or they then lose their beneficial properties. Scientists from Kiel University and the University of Trento have now developed an alternative combining method, so that they retain their characteristic properties. As such, they "felt" the thread-like tubes into a stable 3D network that is able to withstand extreme forces. The research results have been published in the journal Nature Communications.

  • First Diode for Magnetic Fields

    When the left coil is energized, the magnetic field reaches the right coil (top). When the right coil is energized, the magnetic field does not reach the left one (bottom). Luis Veloso

    Innsbruck quantum physicists have constructed a diode for magnetic fields and then tested it in the laboratory. The device, developed by the research groups led by the theorist Oriol Romero-Isart and the experimental physicist Gerhard Kirchmair, could open up a number of new applications. Electric diodes are essential electronic components that conduct electricity in one direction but prevent conduction in the opposite one. They are found at the core of any electronic component, being one of the most essential building blocks.

  • First experimental quantum simulation of particle physics phenomena

    First experimental quantum simulation of particle physics phenomena | Physicists have simulated the creation of elementary particle pairs out of the vacuum by using a quantum computer. IQOQI/Harald Ritsch

    Physicists in Innsbruck have realized the first quantum simulation of lattice gauge theories, building a bridge between high-energy theory and atomic physics. In the journal Nature, Rainer Blatt‘s and Peter Zoller’s research teams describe how they simulated the creation of elementary particle pairs out of the vacuum by using a quantum computer.

  • First Random Laser Made of Paper-Based Ceramics

    The team used conventional laboratory filter paper as a structural template due to its long fibers and the stable structure. Photo: Institute for Complex Systems /Rome

    Working with physicists from the University of Rome, a team led by Professor Cordt Zollfrank from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) built the first controllable random laser based on cellulose paper in Straubing. The team thereby showed how naturally occurring structures can be adapted for technical applications. Hence, materials no longer need to be artificially outfitted with disordered structures, utilizing naturally occurring ones instead.

  • First Real-time Test of Li-Fi Utilization for the Industrial Internet of Things

    First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things. @ istockphoto.com/3alexd/edit Fraunhofer HHI

    The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

  • First Single-photon Source that Works with Atomic Gases at Room Temperature

    Rubidium atoms are excited to their Rydberg states in a glass cell at room temperature. The volume between the glass plates is so thin that colored interference rings are visible to the naked eye. Universität Stuttgart/Max Kovalenko

    Researchers of the Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology IQST at the 5th Institute of Physics at the University of Stuttgart (Head: Prof. Tilman Pfau) have developed a novel, promising variant of a light source for the smallest possible energy packages - a so-called single-photon source. Their work has been published in the latest issue of the journal Science.*

  • First Users at European XFEL

    DESY's Anton Barty (left) and Henry Chapman (right), seen at the SPB/SFX instrument, were in one of the first two user groups. Photo: DESY, Lars Berg

    The first users have now started experiments at the new international research facility in Schenefeld. “This is a very important event, and we are very happy that the first users have now arrived at European XFEL so we can do a full scale test of the facility” said European XFEL Managing Director Prof. Dr. Robert Feidenhans’l. ”The instruments and the supporting teams have made great progress in the recent weeks and months. Together with our first users, we will now do the first real commissioning experiments and collect valuable scientific data. At the same time, we will continue to further advance our facility and concentrate on further improving the integration and stability of the instrumentation” he added.

  • FLASH observes exploding xenon nanoparticles

    With the bright X-ray flashes from FLASH the scientists made xenon clusters explode. The same flash allowed the researchers to record the structure of the cluster just before the explosion (top). With an ion spectrometer the scientists recorded the debris from the explosion (below). Credit: Daniela Rupp/Technical University of Berlin

    DESY’s X-ray laser offers new insights into the interaction between light and matter