Optical electronics

Optical electronics are devices that source, detect and control light. They are used in the study and application of Optoelectronics.

  • 3D printed optical lenses, hardly larger than a human hair

    3D printed optical lenses hardly larger than a human hair | Complex 3D printed objective on an optical fiber in a syringe. University of Stuttgart/ 4th Physics Institute

    3D printing enables the smallest complex micro-objectives

    3D printing revolutionized the manufacturing of complex shapes in the last few years. Using additive depositing of materials, where individual dots or lines are written sequentially, even the most complex devices could be realized fast and easy. This method is now also available for optical elements. Researchers at University of Stuttgart in Germany have used an ultrashort laser pulses in combination with optical photoresist to create optical lenses which are hardly larger than a human hair.

  • Aus zwei mach eins: Wie aus grünem Licht blaues wird

    Aus zwei mach eins Wie aus grünem Licht blaues wird | Photonen-Hochkonversion: Die Energieübertragung zwischen den Molekülen basiert auf einem Austausch von Elektronen (Dexter-Transfer) Abbildung: Michael Oldenburg

    Die Hochkonversion von Photonen ermöglicht, Licht effizienter zu nutzen: Zwei Lichtteilchen werden in ein Lichtteilchen mit höherer Energie umgewandelt. Forscher am KIT haben nun erstmals gezeigt, dass innere Grenzflächen zwischen oberflächengebundenen metallorganischen Gerüstverbindungen (SURMOFs) sich optimal dafür eignen – sie haben aus grünem Licht blaues Licht gemacht. Dieses Ergebnis wurde nun in der Fachzeitschrift Advanced Materials vorgestellt und eröffnet neue Möglichkeiten für optoelektronische Anwendungen wie Solarzellen oder Leuchtdioden. (DOI: 10.1002/adma.201601718)

  • Carbon Nanotubes Couple Light and Matter

    The formation of exciton-polaritons through strong light-matter coupling is a promising strategy for producing electrically pumped carbon-based lasers. Scientists from Heidelberg University and the University of St Andrews (Scotland) have now, for the first time, demonstrated this strong light-matter coupling in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Figure: Arko Graf (Heidelberg University)

    Scientists from Heidelberg and St Andrews work on the basics of new light sources from organic semiconductors. With their research on nanomaterials for optoelectronics, scientists from Heidelberg University and the University of St Andrews (Scotland) have succeeded for the first time to demonstrate a strong interaction of light and matter in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Such strong light-matter coupling is an important step towards realising new light sources, such as electrically pumped lasers based on organic semiconductors. They would be, amongst other things, important for applications in telecommunications. These results are the outcome of a cooperation between Prof. Dr Jana Zaumseil (Heidelberg) and Prof. Dr Malte Gather (St Andrews), and have been published in “Nature Communications”.

  • FOSA LabX 330 Glass – Coating Flexible Glass in a Roll-to-Roll Process

    VON ARDENNE FOSA LabX 330 Glass - coating system for flexible glass. © VON ARDENNE Corporate Archive

    The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP and VON ARDENNE will intensify their cooperation in the field of the coating of flexible glass. Due to its properties, this new material is ideally suited as a substrate for various applications in flexible electronics. Since October 2016, the two partners have been operating the roll-to-roll coating system FOSA LabX 330 Glass together. This new, innovative machine was especially developed for processing flexible glass by the equipment manufacturer VON ARDENNE, which is based in Dresden, Germany. It is the first of its kind worldwide.

  • Fraunhofer HHI at FOE

    Location of Terahertz waves in the electromagnetic spectrum.

    At this year’s Photonics West Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute HHI presents its latest developments in Photonic Components, Systems and Networks.

    Photonics West is the world's largest photonics technologies event. Every year over 20,000 people come to hear the latest research and find the latest devices and systems driving technology markets including state-of-the art medical technologies, the Internet of things, smart manufacturing and “Industry 4.0,” autonomous vehicles, scientific research, communications, displays, and other solutions powered by photonics.

  • Graphene aids optical study of dye molecules

    Graphene aids optical study of dye molecules | Figure: Regular arrangements of dye molecules on graphene. Top: The particular dye molecule used in the study. Image reproduced from original publication.

    By using graphene as substrate, dye molecules self-assemble and form monolayers of high regularity. This increases their optical properties significantly.

  • Humboldt Fellowship for research on tunable optical surfaces for Terahertz technology

    Dr. Corey Shemelya. Thomas Koziel/TU Kaiserslautern

    U.S. scientist Dr. Corey Shemelya has recently started a research stay at the University of Kaiserslautern in the form of a fellowship granted by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. Dr. Shemelya is studying structured optical surfaces which hold potential applications in communication technology and Terahertz imaging, e.g. body scanning equipment for airport safety. Shemelya is working in conjunction with the Terahertz Technology Laboratory of Professor Marco Rahm at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the State Research Center for Optical and Material Sciences (OPTIMAS).

  • Machine Learning Helps Improving Photonic Applications

    Here, stripes with local field maxima are formed, so that quantum dots shine particularly strongly. Carlo Barth / HZB

    Photonic nanostructures can be used for many applications, not just in solar cells, but also in optical sensors for cancer markers or other biomolecules, for example. A team at HZB using computer simulations and machine learning has now shown how the design of such nanostructures can be selectively optimised. The results are published in Communications Physics.

  • Neue Materialien für Displays: Forscher verbessern bananenförmige Flüssigkristalle

    Flüssigkristalle sind ein wesentlicher Baustein für Displays von Computern, Handys und Tabletts. So genannte bananenförmige Flüssigkristalle könnten in Zukunft dabei helfen, diese Technologie noch schneller und energiesparender zu machen. Eine internationale Forschergruppe der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) und des Trinity College in Dublin hat nun eine Möglichkeit gefunden, diese großflächig und defektfrei anzuordnen. Das macht das Material auch für Anwendungen in der Elektronik und der Optik denkbar. Die Ergebnisse wurden kürzlich im internationalen Fachjournal "Nature Communications" veröffentlicht.

  • OLED microdisplays in data glasses for improved human-machine interaction

    Interactive smart eye-glasses using bi-directional OLED microdisplays Jürgen Lösel

    The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP has been developing various applications for OLED microdisplays based on organic semiconductors. By integrating the capabilities of an image sensor directly into the microdisplay, eye movements can be recorded by the smart glasses and utilized for guidance and control functions, as one example. The new design will be debuted at Augmented World Expo Europe (AWE) in Berlin at Booth B25, October 18th – 19th.

  • Open, flexible assembly platform for optical systems

    The flexible and easily programmable assembly platform, tailored to the needs of micro-optical assembly processes.  Source: Fraunhofer IPT

    The assembly of laser systems demands high-precision orientation of the optical components to one another. An assembly platform incorporating a micro-manipulator, which ensures flexible automation of this task, has been developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT in Aachen. This permits optical components for high-power diode lasers, miniaturized lenses or projectors for structured light, for example to be aligned and bonded automatically. The Fraunhofer IPT will be unveiling the new system in front of an expert audience at “SPIE Photonics West” from 28 January till 2 February 2017 in San Francisco.

  • Organic–inorganic heterostructures with programmable electronic properties

    Calculated differential electrical potential induced by a supramolecular lattice of MBB-2 on graphene. Lohe

    Researchers from the University of Strasbourg & CNRS (France), in collaboration with the University of Mons (Belgium), the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (Germany) and the Technische Universität Dresden (Germany), have devised a novel supramolecular strategy to introduce tunable 1D periodic potentials upon self-assembly of ad hoc organic building blocks on graphene, opening the way to the realization of hybrid organic–inorganic multilayer materials with unique electronic and optical properties. These results have been published in Nature Communications.

  • PLUGandWORK connects existing machines and systems to Industrial Internet-of-Things (IIoT)

    The PLUGandWORK Cube by Fraunhofer integrates existing machines into modern production systems. This means that medium-sized companies are also taking the leap into the age of Industrie 4.0. Fraunhofer IOSB

    Fraunhofer solutions integrate existing machines into modern production systems such as MES and SCADA. PLUGandWORK automatically generates a communication server for data exchange with other systems or IT systems. This means that medium-sized companies are also taking the leap into the age of Industry 4.0. The technology is market-ready and is currently being used by several pilot customers. The researchers will be presenting a demo at the Hannover Trade Fair (Hall 2, Booth C22, April 24-28).

  • Selbstorganisierende Nano-Tinten bilden durch Stempeldruck leitfähige und transparente Gitter

    Selbstorganisierende Nano Tinten bilden durch Stempeldruck leitfähige und transparente Gitter | Leitfähige und transparente Gitterstrukturen durch Stempeldruck mit selbstorganisierenden Nano-Tinten. Image: INM

    Transparente Elektronik findet sich heute zum Beispiel in Dünnschicht-Displays, Solarzellen und Touchscreens. Zunehmend ist Elektronik auch auf biegsamen Oberflächen von Interesse. Das erfordert druckbare Materialien, die transparent sind und deren Leitfähigkeit auch bei Verformung hoch bleibt. Dafür haben Forscher des INM – Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien eine neue selbstorganisierende Nano-Tinte mit einem Stempeldruckverfahren kombiniert. Damit stellten sie Gitterstrukturen her, deren Strukturbreiten unter einem Mikrometer liegen.

  • Shedding light on light absorption: titanium dioxide unveiled

    Lattice structure of anatase TiO2 with a graphical representation of the 2D exciton that is generated by the absorption of light. This 2D exciton is the lowest energy excitation of the material.

    MPSD scientists have uncovered the hidden properties of titanium dioxide, one of the most promising materials for light-conversion technology. The anatase crystal form of Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) is one of the most promising materials for photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications nowadays. Despite years of studies on the conversion of light absorbed by anatase TiO₂, into electrical charges, the very nature of its fundamental electronic and optical properties remained still unknown. Scientists from the MPSD (Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter) at CFEL (Center for Free-Electron Laser Science) in Hamburg, together with their international partners at EPFL, Lausanne used a combination of cutting-edge steady-state and ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, as well as theoretical simulation tools to elucidate these fundamental properties of anatase TiO₂. Their work is published in Nature Communications.

  • Shedding Light on Weyl Fermions

    A wave of laser light hits the magnetic material, shaking the electron spins (arrows). This weakens magnetism and induces Weyl fermions in the laser-shaken material. Jörg Harms, MPSD

    Researchers from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics (MPSD) in Hamburg and North Carolina State University in the US have demonstrated that the long-sought magnetic Weyl semi-metallic state can be induced by ultrafast laser pulses in a three-dimensional class of magnetic materials dubbed pyrochlore iridates. Their results, which have now been published in Nature Communications, could enable high-speed magneto-optical topological switching devices for next-generation electronics.

  • Speeding up electronics with light

    Light pulses generate Multi-PHz electric current in bulk solids. The emitted extreme ultraviolet radiation allows scientists to record these electric currents in real time. Graphic: Research Group Attoelectronics, MPQ

    By using ultrafast laser flashes, scientists at Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics generated and measured the fastest electric current inside a solid material. The electrons executed eight million billion oscillations per second, setting a record of human control of electrons inside solids! The performance of modern electronic devices such as computers or mobile phones is dictated by the speed at which electric currents can be made to oscillate inside their electronic circuits.

  • Ultrakompakter Photodetektor

    Ultrakompakter Photodetektor | Ein plasmonischer Detektor, der direkt an einen Silizium-Lichtwellenleiter angekoppelt ist und weniger als ein Mikrometer groß ist, wurde am KIT entwickelt. Grafik: KIT

    Der Datenverkehr wächst weltweit. Glasfaserkabel transportieren die Informationen mit Lichtgeschwindigkeit über weite Entfernungen. An ihrem Ziel müssen die optischen Signale jedoch in elektrische Signale gewandelt werden, um im Computer verarbeitet zu werden. Forscher am KIT haben einen neuartigen Photodetektor entwickelt, dessen geringer Platzbedarf neue Maßstäbe setzt: Das Bauteil weist eine Grundfläche von weniger als einem Millionstel Quadratmillimeter auf, ohne die Datenübertragungsrate zu beeinträchtigen, wie sie im Fachmagazin Optica nun berichten.