Nanocoating

Nanocoating is a nano technological coating technique that is applied on objects, creating an superhydrophobic or superhydrophilic surface. The main use of such coating on objects is to repel liquids off the surfaces.

  • 8 applications of nanocoatings

    Waterproof coating

    Nanocoating is the result of an application where nano structures build a consistent network of molecules on a surface. This entails the chemical process where the surface can be designed to become (super) hydrophobic or hydrophilic for example. Nanocoating is a growing line and some of its applications are already in use whereas many more, with great potential, are being researched on. In this article we will look at the top 8 applications of nanocoating that is currently being used.

  • Defense mechanism employed by algae can effectively inhibit marine fouling

    Illustration of the mode of action of bioinspired underwater paints: Like the natural enzyme vanadium bromoperoxidase cerium dioxide nanoparticles act as a catalyst for the formation of hypobromous acid from bromide ions (contained in sea water) and small amounts of hydrogen peroxide that are formed upon exposure to sun light yielding reduced biofilm formation. ill./©: Tremel research group, JGU

    Cerium dioxide nanoparticles block communication between bacteria and prevent the formation of biofilms

    Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have developed a method that reliably hinders hazardous seawater fouling and is effective, affordable, and easy on the environment. Fouling can occur, for example, as the result of the growth of bacteria, algae, or mollusks in harbor facilities, on boat hulls, and aquaculture netting. The resultant damage and consequential costs can be significant. It is estimated that these are equivalent to 200 billion dollars annually in the shipping industry alone.

  • Entwicklung neuer Entspiegelungen mithilfe nanostrukturierter Schichtmaterialien

    Entwicklung neuer Entspiegelungen mithilfe nanostrukturierter Schichtmaterialien | Halbseitig entspiegelte Linse Photo: W. Oppel, Fraunhofer IOF

    Optische Komponenten begleiten uns in nahezu allen Alltagsanwendungen – von Handykameras über Abstandssensoren in Autos bis hin zu Objektiven für hochauflösende Kameras. Doch ohne Entspiegelung gehen an jeder Grenzfläche einer optischen Komponente mehrere Prozent des Lichtes verloren. Deshalb sind heute insbesondere Systeme aus mehreren Linsen wie z.B. in Fotoapparaten oder Fahrzeugdisplays ohne Antireflex (AR)-Funktion undenkbar. Forschern gelang es nun, erfolgreich eine neue Methode der Entspiegelung mithilfe nanostrukturierter Schichtmaterialien zu entwickeln.

  • Fraunhofer IFAM expands its R&D work on Coatings for protection against corrosion and marine growth

    Outdoor weathering test stand at Westmole, Helgoland. © Fraunhofer IFAM

    Preventing corrosion and its consequences is a key issue in most industries because the cost of corrosion in Germany alone amounts to billions of euros. In addition, the marine growth on surfaces is a huge challenge for shipping, offshore wind turbines, and underwater steel structures. Fraunhofer IFAM has many years of experience developing effective corrosion protection systems and antifouling strategies. In order to further enhance the institute’s expertise in this area, outdoor weathering test stands have been acquired to augment existing test facilities and key personnel with the requisite know-how have been added to the maritime technologies team.

  • Fraunhofer IWS Dresden offers 6th Workshop "Lithium-Sulfur-Batteries"

    Workshop "Lithium-Sulfur-Batteries". © Photo Fraunhofer IWS Dresden

    Lithium-sulfur batteries are the most promising choice for future energy storage systems. Lithium metal anodes are decisive components as they determine cycling stability and specific energy, also in solid state batteries. A topical session will address lithium metal processing, protective coatings and new lithium metal electrode architectures. Novel materials such as nanostructured carbon/sulfur composite cathodes, solid electrolytes and alloy-based anodes are crucial to significantly enhance the cell performance.

  • Hannover Messe: Triple treatment for heat-exchangers

    New nano-coatings have an anti-adhesive, anti-corrosive and antimicrobial effect. Source: Ollmann

    INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials is introducing new nano-coatings that reduce the effort required for cleaning heat exchangers as well as their corrosion. In these new coatings, the research scientists combine antiadhesive, anticorrosive and, on demand, also antimicrobial properties.

    When processing milk and juice, the food industry is using heat exchangers in numerous steps throughout the process. To have no risk to the consumers, heat exchangers have to be free from microbes. Especially in the numerous grooves and recesses of the heat exchanger, persistent biofilms can remain stuck. As a result, heat exchangers must be cleaned at regular intervals using aggressive chemicals.

  • New Method Gives Microscope a Boost in Resolution

    Conventional (left) and mirror-enhanced dSTORM (right) images of a single NPC rings. Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

    Scientists at the University of Würzburg have been able to boost current super-resolution microscopy by a novel tweak. They coated the glass cover slip as part of the sample carrier with tailor-made biocompatible nanosheets that create a "mirror effect". This method shows that localizing single emitters in front of a metal-dielectric coating leads to higher precision, brightness and contrast in Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM). The study was published in the Nature journal "Light: Science and Applications".

  • Physicists develop ultrathin superconducting film – New nano-coating for space tech applications

    Microscopic view of the nanowire. Pic by team of Uwe Hartmann

    Experimental physicists in the research group led by Professor Uwe Hartmann at Saarland University have developed a thin nanomaterial with superconducting properties. Below about -200 °C these materials conduct electricity without loss, levitate magnets and can screen magnetic fields. The particularly interesting aspect of this work is that the research team has succeeded in creating superconducting nanowires that can be woven into an ultra-thin film that is as flexible as cling film. As a result, novel coatings for applications ranging from aerospace to medical technology are becoming possible.

  • Speedy Surfaces

    FLTR: Coating by liquid flame spray; surface SEM ; letters on paper below liquid repellent coating; confocal microscopy image of water drop resting on coating on glass. Copyright Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. Reproduced with permission.

    Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, and the Tampere University of Technology, Finland, have found a new way of applying a structured coating for liquid repellency.
    By using liquid flame spray, the method is extremely fast. Not only water but also oil drops do not adhere to these surfaces but remain spherical and bounce or roll off easily.

  • The nanostructured cloak of invisibility

    Substrate with 450 nm nanopillars (left) compared to an unstructured reference (right). The top set of images were taken at an observation angle of 0°, the bottom set of images at 30°. © Zhaolu Diao

    Most lenses, objectives, eyeglass lenses, and lasers come with an anti-reflective coating. Unfortunately, this coating works optimally only within a narrow wavelength range. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart have now introduced an alternative technology. Instead of coating a surface, they manipulate the surface itself. By comparison with conventional procedures, this provides the desired anti-reflective effect across a wider wavelength range. But more than this, it largely increases the light transmittance through surfaces.