Microelectronics

Microelectronics describes electronic system design, fabrication, etc. on the micrometre-scale (or close to - the criterium is not strict).

  • 8th NRW Nano Conference Dortmund, Open Call for Presentations and Posters

    NRW nanoconference 2018

    The NRW Nano Conference is Germany’s largest conference with international appeal in the field of nanotechnologies. It takes place every two years at changing locations. More than 700 experts from science, industry and politics meet for two days to promote research and application of the key technology at the network meeting.

  • A Transistor of Graphene Nanoribbons

    The microscopic ribbons lie criss-crossed on the gold substrate. Empa

    Transistors based on carbon nanostructures: what sounds like a futuristic dream could be reality in just a few years' time. An international research team working with Empa has now succeeded in producing nanotransistors from graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, as reported in the current issue of the trade journal "Nature Communications." Graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, so-called graphene nanoribbons, have special electrical properties that make them promising candidates for the nanoelectronics of the future:

  • Advanced X-ray Topography Tool Offers More Insights into Semiconductor Material Quality

    X-ray transmission topogram of the 101 reflex for a full 100 mm 4H SiC wafer and a more detailed section of the wafer. Fraunhofer IISB

    Fraunhofer IISB and Rigaku Europe SE are starting a strategic partnership in order to support the European semiconductor industry in improving and better understanding their wafer quality and yield by employing the Rigaku XRTmicron advanced X-ray topography tool. Rigaku Europe SE and Fraunhofer IISB in Erlangen are pleased to announce the formation of a strategic partnership to revolutionize the characterization of semiconductor materials by X-ray topography; therefore, Rigaku has installed the latest generation X-ray topography tool, the Rigaku XRTmicron imaging system, at Fraunhofer IISB.

  • Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

    Arists’ view of the quantized thermal conductance of an atomically thin gold contact. Created by Enrique Sahagun

    In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport. The precise control of electron transport in microelectronics makes complex logic circuits possible that are in daily use in smartphones and laptops. Heat transport is of similar fundamental importance and its control is for instance necessary to efficiently cool the ever smaller chips. An international team including theoretical physicists from Konstanz, Junior Professor Fabian Pauly and Professor Peter Nielaba and their staff, has achieved a real breakthrough in better understanding heat transport at the nanoscale.

  • Cebit 2017: A new simulation process makes complex hardware and software compatible

    Researchers in Kaiserslautern, Dr. Thomas Kuhn (left) and Matthias Jung, developed a simulation method to verify in what combination hardware and software systems function correctly together. Credit: Thomas Koziel

    Technology used in cars, aeroplanes and industrial robots is becoming increasingly complex. Can the software be extended? How does the system handle errors? More and more companies are tasked with such questions. A simulation method, developed by researchers in Kaiserslautern, will provide a solution. With this, they verify in what combination hardware and software systems function correctly together. In addition, the researchers can examine the reaction of systems critical for safety in the occurrence of errors. At the Cebit computer trade fair in Hannover, researchers will present their technology at the research stand of Federal State Rhineland-Palatinate (hall 6, stand C17).

  • Development and Fast Analysis of 3D Printed HF Components

    Fraunhofer FHR’s high frequency scanner SAMMI® analyses the quality of 3D printed high frequency structures. Fraunhofer FHR

    3D printing is becoming increasingly important for the development of modern high frequency systems as it opens up new design possibilities. Fraunhofer FHR is exploring these possibilities for its customers and partners: from designing new HF components to testing these components. Engineers are inspecting the quality of components manufactured using additive processes with their high frequency transmitted light imaging system SAMMI®, e.g. to verify the correct density gradients of the material. As a member of the Forschungsfabrik Mikroelektronik Deutschland, they will present this system at the Hannover Messe in hall 2, booth C22, from April 23 to 27, 2018.

  • Efficiency Boost for Laser Cutting and Drilling at LASER CHINA

    © Photo Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany / Volker Lannert.  A programmable multi-beam optics with galvanometer scanner can split the laser into any number of beamlets. The resulting pattern can be changed and positioned anywhere on the workpiece.

    The Chinese market for industrial laser technology is still growing fast and so does the LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA, which has become the most visited trade show for lasers and optical components. At this year’s trade show, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be presenting new ideas for industrial laser applications, most of which are focused on increased efficiency of laser micro machining processes (Hall N4, Booth 4243).

  • IHP brings INFOS conference to Germany

    Improvement of Silicon ICs by dielectrics: At the INFOS conference about 80 international scientists and engineers  will exchange their expertises about dielectrics and silicon circuits. © IHP/ 2017

    International conference unites engineers, technologists, material researchers, physicists and chemists in Potsdam - Their focus is on Insulating Films on Semicondoctors.

    Frankfurt (Oder). In June 2017, engineers, technologists, material researchers, physicists and chemists will meet in Potsdam. It is the first time that the international conference “INFOS” will be performed in Brandenburg. The Leibniz-institute IHP innovations for high performances microelectronics, located in Frankfurt (Oder), is organising the meeting, where experts from Europe, Asia and America will exchange their expertises on Insulating Films on Semicondoctors (INFOS).

  • Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

    Overview of the entire chip. AC = Accumulator, internal buffer; PC = Program Counter, points at the next instruction to be executed; IR = Instruction Register,  used to buffer data- and instruction-bits received from the external memory; CU = Control Unit, orchestrates the other units according to the instruction to be executed; OR = Output Register, memory used to buffer output-data; ALU = Arithmetic Logic Unit, does the actual calculations.

    Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

    Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a few layers of atoms. Graphene is the best-known 2D material. Molybdenum disulphide (a layer consisting of molybdenum and sulphur atoms that is three-atoms thick) also falls in this category, although, unlike graphene, it has semiconductor properties. With his team, Dr Thomas Mueller from the Photonics Institute at TU Wien is conducting research into 2D materials, viewing them as a promising alternative for the future production of microprocessors and other integrated circuits.

  • Molecular motor-powered biocomputers

    Network-based biocomputation. Top: Illustration of biocomputing units propelled by molecular motors through a junction. Bottom: Scanning electron microscopy images of a biocomputation network system.  © Photo Graphics: Till Korten/TU Dresden, Images: Cornelia Kowol/Fraunhofer ENAS

    Launch of a five-year, 6.1 M€ EU-Horizon 2020 project that aims to build a new type of powerful computer based on biomolecules, TU Dresden is participating. Crashing computers or smartphones and software security holes that allow hackers to steal millions of passwords could be prevented if it were possible to design and verify error-free software. Unfortunately, to date, this is a problem that neither engineers nor supercomputers can solve. One reason is that the computing power required to verify the correct function of a many types of software scales exponentially with the size of the program, so that processing speed, energy consumption and cooling of conventional microelectronic processors prevent current computers from verifying large programs.

  • OLED microdisplays as high-precision optical fingerprint sensors

    High-resolution OLED-on-silicon fingerprint sensor. © Fraunhofer FEP

    Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, a leading provider for research and development in the field of OLED-on-Silicon applications, presents a high-resolution fingerprint-sensor at SID Display Week 2017, from May 23-25 2017 in Los Angeles/USA at the German Pavilion, booth no. 623.

    Fraunhofer FEP has been developing various application-specific OLED microdisplays based on OLED-on-silicon technology successfully for many years. This unique technology enables the high-precision integration of an OLED as light source on a microchip. Moreover this microchip can be designed with further sensor elements, e.g. photodiodes.

  • Splicing Together a Thin Film in Motion

    The principle of time-spliced imaging is depicted here for a simulated evolution of magnetic field lines from four rotating magnetic dipoles that have the same initial anti-ferromagnetic structure as the studied material, neodymium nickelate. The early frames in the time series pin down the set of possible reconstructions at later times, sharpening the image recovery by ruling out erroneous solutions. (c) Jörg Harms / MPSD

    Technology reliant on thin film materials has become ubiquitous in our everyday life. Control of the electronic properties of materials at the nanometer level is reflected in advances of computers, solar energy and batteries. The electronic behavior of thin films is heavily influenced by the contact with their surroundings, as exemplified by the recent discovery of 2D superconductivity at a thin film interface. However, information about how such entwined states come into existence is limited by the lack of tools capable of visualizing such buried interfaces.