Micro and nanofabrication

Microfabrication is the process of fabricating miniature structures of micrometre scales and smaller. Historically, the earliest microfabrication processes were used for integrated circuit fabrication, also known as "semiconductor manufacturing" or "semiconductor device fabrication".

 

Nanofabrication is the design and manufacture of devices with dimensions measured in nanometers. One nanometer is 10 -9 meter, or a millionth of a millimeter.

Nanofabrication is of interest to computer engineers because it opens the door to super-high-density microprocessor s and memory chip s. It has been suggested that each data bit could be stored in a single atom . Carrying this further, a single atom might even be able to represent a byte or word of data. Nanofabrication has also caught the attention of the medical industry, the military, and the aerospace industry.

There are several ways that nanofabrication might be done. One method involves scaling down integrated-circuit ( IC ) fabrication that has been standard since the 1970s, removing one atom at a time until the desired structure emerges. A more sophisticated hypothetical scheme involves the assembly of a chip atom-by-atom; this would resemble bricklaying. An extension of this is the notion that a chip might assemble itself atom-by-atom using programmable nanomachines. Finally, it has been suggested that a so-called biochip might be grown like a plant from a seed; the components would form by a process resembling cell division in living things.

  • 3D printed optical lenses, hardly larger than a human hair

    3D printed optical lenses hardly larger than a human hair | Complex 3D printed objective on an optical fiber in a syringe. University of Stuttgart/ 4th Physics Institute

    3D printing enables the smallest complex micro-objectives

    3D printing revolutionized the manufacturing of complex shapes in the last few years. Using additive depositing of materials, where individual dots or lines are written sequentially, even the most complex devices could be realized fast and easy. This method is now also available for optical elements. Researchers at University of Stuttgart in Germany have used an ultrashort laser pulses in combination with optical photoresist to create optical lenses which are hardly larger than a human hair.

  • Active Implants: How Gold Binds to Silicone Rubber

    Thin film preparation scheme. a) Cross section of the organic molecular beam deposition setup for the fabrication of soft multi-layer nanostructures under ultra-high vacuum conditions. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry at an incident angle of 20° simultaneously monitors film thickness, optical properties, and plasmonics. Representative schemes of thermally grown soft nanostructures: b) self-assembled Au particles bound to bi-functional, thiol-terminated PDMS; c) wrinkled Cr/PDMS; d) Au nanoparticles on a PDMS membrane. Coherent electron oscillations occur if the nanoparticles become excited at the resonance frequency. Due to the incident 4 × 10 mm2 beam dimension, SE monitors nanostructures over a macroscopic area. (© Wiley-VCH Verlag)

    Flexible electronic parts could significantly improve medical implants. However, electroconductive gold atoms usually hardly bind to silicones. Researchers from the University of Basel have now been able to modify short-chain silicones in a way, that they build strong bonds to gold atoms. The results have been published in the journal «Advanced Electronic Materials».

    Ultra-thin and compliant electrodes are essential for flexible electronic parts. When it comes to medical implants, the challenge lays in the selection of the materials, which have to be biocompatible. Silicones were particularly promising for application in the human body because they resemble the surrounding human tissue in elasticity and resilience. Gold also poses an excellent electrical conductivity but does only weakly bind to silicone, which results in unstable structures.

  • Aus zwei mach eins: Wie aus grünem Licht blaues wird

    Aus zwei mach eins Wie aus grünem Licht blaues wird | Photonen-Hochkonversion: Die Energieübertragung zwischen den Molekülen basiert auf einem Austausch von Elektronen (Dexter-Transfer) Abbildung: Michael Oldenburg

    Die Hochkonversion von Photonen ermöglicht, Licht effizienter zu nutzen: Zwei Lichtteilchen werden in ein Lichtteilchen mit höherer Energie umgewandelt. Forscher am KIT haben nun erstmals gezeigt, dass innere Grenzflächen zwischen oberflächengebundenen metallorganischen Gerüstverbindungen (SURMOFs) sich optimal dafür eignen – sie haben aus grünem Licht blaues Licht gemacht. Dieses Ergebnis wurde nun in der Fachzeitschrift Advanced Materials vorgestellt und eröffnet neue Möglichkeiten für optoelektronische Anwendungen wie Solarzellen oder Leuchtdioden. (DOI: 10.1002/adma.201601718)

  • Devarnishing by electron beam

    The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP will be exhibiting its electron beam technology as an alternative beam tool for devarnishing at the parts2clean trade show in Stuttgart, from May 31st to June 2nd, 2016 at the joint booth of the Fraunhofer Cleaning Technology Alliance, Hall 7, Booth B41.

  • Is it possible to overcome all the barriers to nanofluids market uptake?

    Copyright Nanouptake

    Overcoming Barriers to Nanofluids Market Uptake (COST Action CA15119) is creating a Europe-wide network of leading R+D+i institutions, and of key industries, to develop and foster the use of nanofluids as advanced heat transfer/thermal storage materials to increase the efficiency of heat exchange and storage systems.

    By developing of nanofluids up to higher Technological Readiness Levels (TRL) and overcoming commercial application barriers, Nanouptake will contribute to achieve the European Horizon 2020 Energy and Climate ambitious objectives.

  • Laser-manufactured customized lenses

    Fused silica with a slit, made by processing with inverse laser drilling; thickness: 6.35 mm, angle of the undercut: approx. 10°. Photo: Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany.

    The Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is presenting selected project results in the areas of laser material processing of glass optics and packaging at the 13th Optatec international trade fair in Frankfurt from June 7 to 9, 2016. Highlights include the freeformOPT software that can be used to calculate individual free-form optics, as well as new laser processes for shaping, polishing, structuring and assembling fused silica optics.

  • Maßgeschneiderte Spitzen für Rasterkraftmikroskope dank Nano-3D-Druck

    Maßgeschneiderte Spitzen für Rasterkraftmikroskope dank Nano 3D Druck picture2 | Optimal an spezielle Anforderungen angepasste Sondenspitzen für Rasterkraftmikroskope können nun am KIT mittels Nano-3D-Druck hergestellt werden. Aufnahme: KIT

    Rasterkraftmikroskope machen die Nanostruktur von Oberflächen sichtbar. Ihre Sonden tasten das Untersuchungsmaterial dazu mit feinsten Messnadeln ab. Am KIT ist es nun gelungen, den Messnadeln eine maßgeschneiderte Form zu geben. So kann eine passende Messspitze für jede Messaufgabe hergestellt werden, etwa für verschiedenartige biologische Proben. Möglich macht dies die 3D-Laserlithografie, also ein 3D-Drucker für Strukturen in Nanometer-Größe. Die Fachpublikation Applied Physics Letters widmet diesem Erfolg nun ihre Titelseite. DOI: 10.1063/1.4960386

  • Molekularelektronik: Sanftes Entkoppeln legt Nanostrukturen frei

    Molekularelektronik Sanftes Entkoppeln legt Nanostrukturen frei | Jodatome (lila) wandern zwischen das organische Netz und die metallische Unterlage und reduzieren die Haftung. IFM, University of Linköping

    Am Synchrotronspeicherring BESSY II des Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) hat ein internationales Team einen raffinierten Weg gefunden, um organische Nanostrukturen von Metalloberflächen abzukoppeln. Die Messungen belegen: Durch Einschleusen von Jod erhält man ein Netz aus organischen Molekülen, die fast wie ein freistehendes Netz erscheinen. Dies könnte ein Weg sein, um Nanostrukturen von Metalloberflächen auf andere Oberflächen zu übertragen, die sich besser für molekulare Elektronik eignen. Die Ergebnisse sind in der Zeitschrift „Angewandte Chemie“ publiziert.

  • Neues Graduiertenkolleg der TU Ilmenau entwickelt Verfahren zur Produktion im Nanometerbereich

    Reinraum an der TU Ilmenau. Foto: TU Imenau

    Die Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft hat der Technischen Universität Ilmenau die Einrichtung des Graduiertenkollegs „Spitzen- und laserbasierte 3D-Nanofabrikation in ausgedehnten makroskopischen Arbeitsbereichen (NanoFab)“ bewilligt und fördert es mit 5,2 Millionen Euro für viereinhalb Jahre. Graduiertenkollegs sind unter Universitäten sehr begehrt, denn die Förderung ermöglicht ihnen hochspezialisierte Spitzenforschung und eröffnet gleichzeitig jungen Wissenschaftlern die Möglichkeit, einen Doktorgrad zu erlangen.

  • Physics That Gets Under Your Skin

    Visional minimal invasive microsurgery - with the first-time real-time tracking of mobile micro-objects deep in the tissue, a decisive step has been taken. Picture Credit: Science Picture Co / Alamy Stock Photo

    Due to modern advances in medicine ever smaller objects are moved through the human body: nanotherapeutics, micro-implants, mini-catheters and tiny medical instruments. The next generation of minimally invasive microsurgery will enable small micro robots to move with their own drive through the body and through the tissue to transport substances and micro-objects. Therefore, new methods must be developed to locate these micro-objects precisely and to monitor their movement. Conventional methods such as ultrasound, X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fail either due to insufficient resolution or due to long-term damage from radioactivity or high magnetic fields.

  • Selbstorganisierende Nano-Tinten bilden durch Stempeldruck leitfähige und transparente Gitter

    Selbstorganisierende Nano Tinten bilden durch Stempeldruck leitfähige und transparente Gitter | Leitfähige und transparente Gitterstrukturen durch Stempeldruck mit selbstorganisierenden Nano-Tinten. Image: INM

    Transparente Elektronik findet sich heute zum Beispiel in Dünnschicht-Displays, Solarzellen und Touchscreens. Zunehmend ist Elektronik auch auf biegsamen Oberflächen von Interesse. Das erfordert druckbare Materialien, die transparent sind und deren Leitfähigkeit auch bei Verformung hoch bleibt. Dafür haben Forscher des INM – Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien eine neue selbstorganisierende Nano-Tinte mit einem Stempeldruckverfahren kombiniert. Damit stellten sie Gitterstrukturen her, deren Strukturbreiten unter einem Mikrometer liegen.