metal alloy

An alloy is a mixture of metals or a mixture of a metal and another element. Alloys are defined by metallic bonding character. An alloy may be a solid solution of metal elements (a single phase) or a mixture of metallic phases (two or more solutions).

  • Additive Machines Discover Superalloys

    By means of laser powder build-up welding, components made of different materials can be integrally manufactured. © Fraunhofer IWS Dresden

    Fraunhofer lighthouse project "futureAM" expected to speed up "additive manufacturing" by a factor ten. Scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS in Dresden have developed innovative methods enabling more materials to be processed in additive manufacturing than ever before. For example, additive manufacturing systems could facilitate better future aircraft engines with lower fuel consumption.

  • Alloys From the Laser Printer

    These small sized samples are made out of oxide dispersion strengthened titanium aluminides and have been made as part of the PhD-work. Empa

    In the future, new designer alloys for aerospace applications can be manufactured using the 3-D laser melting process (Additive Manufacturing). Pioneering work in this field was provided by Empa researcher Christoph Kenel, who works today at Northwestern University (Chicago). Empa grants him the Research Award 2017. Titan-Aluminum alloys are combining low density, high strength and oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures and are therefore of high technical relevance e.g. in aerospace engineering.

  • An Unlikely Marriage Among Oxides

    Sebastian Siol showing a sample of heterostructural oxides, which could be a promising coating for smart windows. Empa

    Sebastian Siol is looking for new materials with unusual properties that were so far not accessible in experiments. To do this, he connects partners who don't really fit together: One partner forces the other into a state that would not be possible without the unlikely pairing. Siol also makes sure that the crystal bonds last in everyday life. Only then are they interesting for industrial applications.

  • Gum metals pave the way for new applications

    Scanning electron microscopy image showing the different phases in the peculiar gum-type titanium alloy.  Jian Zhang, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH

    Max Planck scientists discover peculiarities in crystal structure of titanium alloy

    Metals which can be bent as gum pave the way for new industrial applications for example in the aerospace industry. These so-called gum metals exist but the mechanism behind this behaviour was still unsettled and thus difficult to be used for applications. Scientists from the Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung (MPIE) in Düsseldorf have observed a new phase transformation in a titanium alloy that could further our understanding of exactly this behaviour whereby the term “phase” refers to the crystal structure in which the atoms are arranged.

  • High Entropy Alloys for Hot Turbines and Tireless Metal-Forming Presses

    For the first time, scientists at Fraunhofer IWS printed 3D high-entropy demonstrator structures made of the Cantor alloy "CrMnFeCoNi" using the Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) process. © Fraunhofer IWS Dresden

    Symposium in Dresden focuses on a new class of materials.
    A new class of materials promises many innovations in aviation, turbine construction and other branches of industry: High entropy alloys (HEA) are metals in which five or more elements are atomically bonded in similar proportions. Properly designed, they are harder, more heat-resistant and lighter than steel, aluminum and other classic materials. For about 15 years, engineers around the world have been trying to make these innovative materials ready for series production. But high-entropy alloys are still too expensive and difficult to process.

  • Improving heating-based components with foam

    Open-cell metal foam can be used in heat exchangers, convectors and coolers.   © Fraunhofer IFAM Dresden

    The energy efficiency of heat exchangers, convectors and cooling elements can be improved even further. Open-pore structures made of metal foam, which have good thermal conductivity and a large surface, offer interesting possibilities here. The BINE Projektinfo brochure entitled "Metal foam – a material for heat engineering" (11/2016) presents the development work for these materials. The aim is to optimise the manufacturing process, reduce costs and test the materials on test rigs. The material properties of the different alloys will be recorded in a database.

  • Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

    Selective laser melting makes it possible to manufacture highly complex geometries made of magnesium and magnesium alloys in a flexible and precise way. LZH

    Smallest structures, complex parts or individual implants – due to its flexibility additive manufacturing has a high potential for use in modern production technology. Therefore, this topic is perfectly suited for the ”Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing” that is organized by NiedersachsenMetall and the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) to transfer the latest research and development results to industrial application. On November 09th, 2016, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are invited to come to the LZH to inform themselves about laser-based additive manufacturing.

  • Legierungen werden fest und formbar

    Für die Stahlindustrie zeichnet sich womöglich ein Ausweg aus einem Dilemma ab, das schon solange besteht wie Menschen Metall verarbeiten. Wissenschaftler des Max-Planck-Instituts für Eisenforschung in Düsseldorf präsentieren einen neuartigen metallischen Werkstoff, der gleichzeitig sehr fest und trotzdem gut formbar ist. Bislang ließ sich die eine Materialeigenschaft nur auf Kosten der anderen verbessern. Das ändern die Düsseldorfer Forscher, indem sie einen neuen Weg beider Entwicklung von metallischen Werkstoffen gehen. So tragen sie dazu bei, dass sich Bauteile aus Metall künftig dünnwandiger konstruieren und dadurch Ressourcen schonen lassen.

  • Supported Liquid Metal Catalysts – a New Generation of Reaction Accelerators

    A diagram illustrating the processes at the catalytic surface of a liquid drop of gallium containing small amounts of palladium during the catalytic dehydrogenation of n-butane.  Image: FAU/Mathias Grabau and Florian Maier

    Catalysts are agents that initiate chemical reactions, speed them up or significantly increase the yield of the desired product. New and improved catalysts are thus considered the key to creating more sustainable and efficient production processes in the chemical industry. In a joint research project, five professors at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and their teams have recently discovered how to bypass the known drawbacks of the technical catalysts that are currently in use by means of a new material concept that makes the creation of significantly more efficient catalysts possible.