Medical Implant Technology

  • 3D printing to repair damage in the human body

    Dr. Ivan Minev in front of his 3D printer © BIOTEC

    Freigeist Fellowship supports Dr. Ivan Minev in using 3D printing to find ways to repair damage in the human body.
    Dr. Ivan Minev, research group leader at the BIOTEC/CRTD, has been awarded a Freigeist Fellowship from the VolkswagenStiftung. This five-year, 920.000 EUR grant will enable him to establish his own research team. The ‘Freigeist’ initiative is directed toward enthusiastic scientists and scholars with an outstanding record that are given the opportunity to enjoy maximum freedom in their early scientific career.

  • A Boost for Biofuel Cells

    Boosting the energy output by storing and bundling the energy of many spontaneous enzyme reactions. Alejandro Posada

    In chemistry, a reaction is spontaneous when it does not need the addition of an external energy input. How much energy is released in a reaction is dictated by the laws of thermodynamics. In the case of the spontaneous reactions that occur in the human body this is often not enough to power medical implants. Now, scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart, together with an international team of researchers, found a way to boost the energy output by storing and bundling the energy of many spontaneous enzyme reactions. The work is published in the journal Nature Communications.

  • A Fine-tuned Laser Welds More Effectively

    Cardiac pacemakers are usually housed in a titanium housing that is welded together from two parts. Empa has optimized the frequency of the working laser so that no black edges appear during welding, which would reduce the value of the medical product. Image: istockphoto

    Using laser technology Empa scientists optimized a technique to weld the electronics of implantable pacemakers and defibrillators into a titanium case. The medtech company Medtronic is now using the method worldwide to produce these devices. In Tolochenaz (Canton of Vaud) the US medtech company Medtronic produces one out of five heart pacemakers available on the global market and one out of four defibrillators. The electronics of these implantable devic-es are housed in titanium cases, which thus far were welded hermetically with a solid state flash laser. However, the lasers are high-maintenance and often the source of irregularities. Moreover, they require water cooling and take up a lot of space.

  • Active Implants: How Gold Binds to Silicone Rubber

    Thin film preparation scheme. a) Cross section of the organic molecular beam deposition setup for the fabrication of soft multi-layer nanostructures under ultra-high vacuum conditions. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry at an incident angle of 20° simultaneously monitors film thickness, optical properties, and plasmonics. Representative schemes of thermally grown soft nanostructures: b) self-assembled Au particles bound to bi-functional, thiol-terminated PDMS; c) wrinkled Cr/PDMS; d) Au nanoparticles on a PDMS membrane. Coherent electron oscillations occur if the nanoparticles become excited at the resonance frequency. Due to the incident 4 × 10 mm2 beam dimension, SE monitors nanostructures over a macroscopic area. (© Wiley-VCH Verlag)

    Flexible electronic parts could significantly improve medical implants. However, electroconductive gold atoms usually hardly bind to silicones. Researchers from the University of Basel have now been able to modify short-chain silicones in a way, that they build strong bonds to gold atoms. The results have been published in the journal «Advanced Electronic Materials».

    Ultra-thin and compliant electrodes are essential for flexible electronic parts. When it comes to medical implants, the challenge lays in the selection of the materials, which have to be biocompatible. Silicones were particularly promising for application in the human body because they resemble the surrounding human tissue in elasticity and resilience. Gold also poses an excellent electrical conductivity but does only weakly bind to silicone, which results in unstable structures.

  • Bioabbaubare Polymer-Beschichtung für Implantate

    Im mikroskopischen Fluoreszenzbild lassen sich die Strukturen aus Molekülen erkennen, die zu Testzwecken auf die bioabbaubare Beschichtung gedruckt wurden. Im mikroskopischen Fluoreszenzbild lassen sich die Strukturen aus Molekülen erkennen, die zu Testzwecken auf die bioabbaubare Beschichtung gedruckt wurden.  Bild: KIT

    Medizinische Implantate tragen oft Oberflächensubstrate, die Wirkstoffe abgeben oder auf denen Biomoleküle sowie Zellen besser haften können. Allerdings gab es bislang keine abbaubaren Gasphasenbeschichtungen für abbaubare Implantate wie chirurgische Nahtmaterialien oder Gerüste für die Gewebezucht. Eine Polymerbeschichtung, die im Körper wie ihr Träger abgebaut wird, stellen nun Forscher des Karlsruher Instituts für Technologie in der Fachzeitschrift Angewandte Chemie vor. „Unsere neuen abbaubaren Polymerfilme könnten breite Anwendung für die Funktionalisierung und Beschichtung von Oberflächen finden, in den Biowissenschaften über die Medizin bis hin zur Lebensmittelverpackung“, so Professor Joerg Lahann, Co-Direktor des Instituts für Funktionelle Grenzflächen am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie. Gemeinsam in einem internationalen Team stellte er Polymerfilme her, die mit funktionellen Seitengruppen als „Verankerungspunkte“ für Moleküle ausgestattet waren, an die sie Fluoreszenzfarbstoffe und Biomoleküle andocken ließen.

  • Biodegradable composites: a significant advance in medical implant technology

    • Evonik is conducting research on new composite materials for the fixation of fractured bones
    • Bioresorbable polymers degrade naturally in the body, eliminating the need for additional surgery
    • Medical implant technology is an attractive and growing market

  • COMPAMED '18 Presents International Medical Technology Experts with their Future Trend Technologies

    Concept of the Sens-o-Spheres with power receiver, microcontroller and signal processing, battery as well as encapsulation. (c) TU Dresden

    The COMPAMED, which takes place annually co-located to the MEDICA in Dusseldorf, Germany, is an established and world-wide well-known marketplace for medical components and technologies. Every year, the COMPAMED asserts itself as the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing.

    Especially in the field of medical devices for mobile diagnostics, therapy and laboratory equipment increasingly powerful, smart and reliable high-tech solutions are needed. This is why the demand for miniaturization of medical components continues to grow steadily.

  • COMPAMED 2016 connected medical devices and people

    Materialise NV from Belgium speaking on “Innovation in 3D Printed Wearables” at COMPAMED HIGH-TECH Forum 2016. IVAM

    Miniaturized connected systems and outstanding business contacts: forming networks on both technical and business level was one of the key features of COMPAMED 2016, the international trade fair for suppliers and manufacturers of medical technologies. This trend was visible at and enhanced by the joint trade fair booth of the IVAM Microtechnology Network in hall 8a, the accompanying presentation forum and numerous B2B meetings between companies from Germany and Japan.

  • Mikrosensor hilft herzkranken Menschen

    Patient Mike Bartsch und DHZB-Kardiologe Dr. Felix Schönrath DHZB

    Am Deutschen Herzzentrum Berlin wird ein neuartiges Implantat eingesetzt, das direkt am Herzen den Blutdruck misst und drahtlos überträgt. Es ermöglicht den Ärzten eine bessere Überwachung von Patienten mit schwerer Herzschwäche.

  • Nanorobots Propel Through the Eye

    Nanorobots injected into the eye on their way towards the retina. Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems

    Scientists developed specially coated nanometer-sized vehicles that can be actively moved through dense tissue like the vitreous of the eye. So far, the transport of nano-vehicles has only been demonstrated in model systems or biological fluids, but not in real tissue. The work was published in the journal Science Advances and constitutes one step further towards nanorobots becoming minimally-invasive tools for precisely delivering medicine to where it is needed.

  • New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

    NanEye - The award winning, smallest digital camera in the world, for disposable endoscope. CMOSIS Germany GmbH

    COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

  • No sugar coating, but sweet nonetheless

    In the upper part of the image you can see an enlarged picture of the microprobe manufactured in Freiburg for stimulating and simultaneously gathering data. Below there is a cross section oft he coating made from the polymer PEDOT that has stored an anti-inflammatory medicine that can be released by applying negative voltage.  Source: Christian Böhler, Maria Asplund

    First long-term stabile brain implant developed based on an anti-inflammatory coating.

    Complex neurotechnological devices are required to directly select and influence brain waves inside the skull’s interior. Although it has become relatively easy to implement the devices, researchers are still faced with challenges when trying to keep them running properly in living organisms over time. But that could be changing now, thanks to a new method from Freiburg. A research team was able to create a microprobe that grows into the neural tissue without inflammation and with the help of a medicinal coating.

  • Optics meets genetic engineering: Innovation Forum Optogenetics has started

    Using optogenetics, cells (here neuronal cell lines) can be individually changed using light. LZH

    Which potentials does the field of optogenetics offer? What are the future business fields and sales markets? The Innovation Network Optogenetics, which started in June, is out to answer these questions. A two-day session on November 28th and 29th, 2017, in Hannover, will bring together stakeholders from different technology areas, in order to bundle competencies and to create synergy. The network was initiated by the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH).

  • Physik fürs „Leben“ : Innovationen in Medizin und Life Sciences - Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft schlägt Brücke zwischen Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft

    Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft

    „The real challenge in innovation is not invention – coming up with good ideas – but in making them work technically and commercially.” (T.A. Edison). Unter diesem Motto fand die DPG- Arbeitstagung Forschung – Entwicklung – Innovation XLI vom 6. November 2016 bis zum 8. November im Physikzentrum Bad Honnef statt. Das Schwerpunktthema in diesem Jahr lautete Physik fürs „Leben“ –Innovationen in Medizin und Life Sciences.

  • Termination of lethal arrhythmia with light

    A: Optogenetic defibrillation (blue bar) stops arrhythmia in mouse heart. B: Simulation of optogenetic defibrillation (red bar) in a model of a human heart.   © Image: Tobias Brügmann (University Bonn)/Patrick M. Boyle (Johns Hopkins University)

    A research team from the University of Bonn has succeeded for the first time in using light stimuli to stop life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia in mouse hearts. Furthermore, as shown in computer simulations at Johns Hopkins University, this technique could also be used successfully for human hearts. The study opens up a whole new approach to the development of implantable optical defibrillators, in which the strong electrical impulses of conventional defibrillators are replaced by gentler, pain-free light impulses. The "Journal of Clinical Investigation" has now published the results.

  • Wie Materialoberflächen Zellgemeinschaften steuern

    Wie Materialoberflächen Zellgemeinschaften steuern picture 2 | Jenaer Forschern ist es gelungen, Polymeroberflächen von künstlichen Blutgefäßen so zu verändern, dass sie die Anhaftung der Blutplättchen und damit die Blutgerinnung wesentlich reduzieren. Foto: Jan-Peter Kasper/FSU

    Von der Natur inspiriert: Materialwissenschaftler der Uni Jena nutzen strukturierte Oberflächen, um medizinische Implantate sicherer zu machen