Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a technique for imaging utilizing spin resonance to high-frequency pulses in a (strong) magnetic field.

  • Blood flow under magnetic magnifier

    Arterial Spin Labeling allows to visualize vascular territories in the brain without the need of contrast agents – one of many applications. © Photo Fraunhofer MEVIS

    A training workshop at Fraunhofer MEVIS will deliver information about the possibilities of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging.

    When diagnosing strokes and heart diseases or looking at tumors, perfusion magnetic resonance imaging offers a gentler way to capture the blood flow circulation in the organs. However, the method is far from being implemented to its full potential at many clinics. The Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS in Bremen, Germany is organizing a workshop entitled “Measurement of Perfusion and Capillary Exchange” from June 21 to 23 to promote adoption of the method. The event will provide information about its applications and the current state of research.

  • Jens Frahm Receives European Inventor Award for Fast MRI in Medical Diagnostics

    Prof. Dr. Jens Frahm. (c) Frank Vinken / Max Planck Society

    With the European Inventor Award 2018, the European Patent Office (EPO) honored Jens Frahm of the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen for his ground-breaking advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In two steps, the physicist and his team succeeded in speeding up MRI by a factor of up to 10,000 and established it in clinical practice.

  • Measuring Smallest Magnetic Fields in the Brain Using Diamond and Laser Technology

    Imaging procedures such as magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) allow to measure the activity of brains and help prenatal treatment of diseases. © Okrasyuk - shutterstock

    In July 2018, a research project with an entirely innovative approach to measuring magnetic fields in tissue started at the Fraunhofer IAF: The scientists will produce and optimize NV centers in diamond in order to achieve highly sensitive magnet field detectors working at room temperature, and by those means develop the world’s first laser threshold magnetometer. Smallest magnetic fields, like the ones produced in neuronal networks or through brainwaves, can be detected with this technology. The research project »NV-doped CVD diamond for ultra-sensitive Laser Threshold Magnetometry«, short »DiLaMag«, is supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.

  • Novel Sensor Implant Radically Improves Significance of NMR Brain Scans

    Illustration of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) needle in the brain tissue. © whitehoune - stock.adobe.com, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, University of Stuttgart. Montage: Martin Vötsch (design-galaxie.de)

     

    A team of neuroscientists and electrical engineers from Germany and Switzerland developed a highly sensitive implant that enables to probe brain physiology with unparalleled spatial and temporal resolution. Now published in Nature Methods, they introduce an ultra-fine needle with an integrated chip that is capable of detecting and transmitting nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data from nanoliter volumes of brain oxygen metabolism. The breakthrough design will allow entirely new applications in the life sciences.

  • Operating in the operating theatre of the future

    Modern imaging technologies inside the operating theatre, Inselspital, Berne

    Inselspital is the first hospital in Switzerland to have a highly modern surgical area that can be used in an interdisciplinary way by all surgical specialties. Modern imaging technologies inside the operating theatre allow for quality checks during complicated operations.

    Beginning in the middle of February, 2017, in the Intensive Treatment, Emergency and Operation Centre (IEO) at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, all operative specialities will have three new operation theatres available that have integrated computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Together with the hybrid operating theatre, which allows for intra-operative angiography, they create an operating area that is one of a kind in Switzerland.

  • Revolutionizing Cancer Research with Diamond

    The Fraunhofer IAF is coordinating the joint project »DiaPol«. As part of the project, researchers combine the classical MRI method with a nanodiamond polarisator. romaset – Fotolia.com

    With nanodiamond the tumor tissue can be detected sooner and distinguished better from the healthy surrounding tissue. Aiming at an improvement of the MRI procedure in the joint project »DiaPol« Fraunhofer IAF cooperates with the University of Ulm, the company NVision Imaging Technologies GmbH, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Israeli Center for Advanced Diamond Technologies (ICDAT). The novel technology offers great opportunities: the extremely precise and quickly available results make it possible to adjust the treatment of the tumor tissue to the patient in a significantly more efficient way than it has ever been possible with previous methods.