Magnetic measurement

The strength of a magnet is most commonly measured using a magnetometer, also known as a gaussmeter, which are used to measure everything from the Earth's magnetic field to small magnets. A magnetometer consists of a small conductor or semiconductor at the tip of a probe through which an electrical current is passed.

  • Highly Sensitive Sensors to Measure the Heart and Brain Activity

    By applying a magnetic field, the bending beam vibrates. A permanently electrically charged electret (blue) pulls the bending beam. This way his vibrance gets stronger. Copyright: Marleen Schweichel

     

    Electrical signals measurements such as the ECG (electrocardiogram) can show how the human brain or heart works. Next to electrical signals magnetic signals also reveal something about the activity of these organs. They could be measured with little effort and without skin contact. But the especially weak signals require highly sensitive sensors. Scientists from the Collaboraive research Center 1261 "Magnetoelectric Sensors" at Kiel University have now developed a new concept for cantilever sensors, with the future aim of measuring these low frequencies of heart and brain activity. The extremely small, energy-efficient sensors are particularly well-suited for medical applications or mobile microelectronics. This is made possible by the use of electrets. Such material is permanently electrically charged, and is also used in microphones for hearing aids or mobile phones. The research team presented its sensor concept in a special edition of the renowned journal Nano Energy.

     

  • Magnetization in Small Components can now be Filmed in the Laboratory

    Time-resolved measurement of the motion of a magnetic vortex core in the presence of an oscillating magnetic field. Ill./©: Daniel Schönke

     

    In the future, today's electronic storage technology may be superseded by devices based on tiny magnetic structures. These individual magnetic regions correspond to bits and need to be as small as possible and capable of rapid switching. In order to better understand the underlying physics and to optimize the components, various techniques can be used to visualize the magnetization behavior.

  • New Proton Record: Researchers Measure magnetic moment with greatest possible precision

    How magnetic is the proton? Scientists at JGU set a new record for measuring the proton. photo/©: Georg Schneider

    High-precision measurement of the g-factor eleven times more precise than before / Results indicate a strong similarity between protons and antiprotons. The magnetic moment of an individual proton is inconceivably small, but can still be quantified. The basis for undertaking this measurement was laid over ten years ago, and physicists of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, GSI Darmstadt, and the RIKEN research institute in Japan are still performing experiments to measure this force with a single particle to the greatest possible precision.