Liver

  • IMI SAFE-T and C-Path PSTC Obtain Regulatory Support For New Liver Safety Biomarkers

    Micrograph of an intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (right of image) adjacent to benign hepatocytes (left of image). H&E stain.

    FDA and EMA Letters of Support Pave the Way for Clinical Qualification. The Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) SAFE-T (Safer and Faster Evidence Based Translation) Consortium and The Critical Path Institute (C-Path) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) each issued a Biomarker Letter of Support for new liver safety biomarkers investigated by the SAFE-T Drug-Induced Liver Injury Work Package, and the Predictive Safety Testing Consortium’s (PSTC) Hepatotoxicity Working Group.

  • Liquid Crystal Liver

    Reconstruction of the main structures forming the liver lobule: Central (CV) and Portal veins (PV), sinusoidal (magenta) and bile canaliculi (green) networks, and hepatocytes (random colours). Morales-Navarrete et al. / MPI-CBG

    First and new realistic 3D model of the liver lobule since the year 1949: In 1949, Hans Elias pioneered the structural analysis of the mammalian liver tissue and proposed a model of the liver lobule, which is used to this day in textbooks. Almost 70 years later, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, the MPI for the Physics of Complex Systems, & the TU Dresden took advantage of novel microscopy developments, computer-aided image analysis, & 3D tissue reconstruction and created a new realistic 3D model of liver organization. Remarkably, they discovered that the liver features an organized structure, similar to liquid crystals.

  • Ultrasound scalpel destroys liver tumors

    Doctors wish to use focused ultrasound to treat tumors in moving organs, such as the liver, shown here. Fraunhofer MEVIS

    Focused ultrasound can effectively destroy tumor cells. Until now, this method has only been used for organs such as the prostate and uterus. At the European Congress of Radiology, Fraunhofer researchers will present a method, developed as part of the TRANS-FUSIMO EU project, that enables focused ultrasound treatment of the liver, an organ that moves while breathing. In the future, this could enable treatment of certain liver tumors in a more gentle way.

    Ultrasound has long served as a diagnostic method. Its application as a form of therapy treatment, however, is relatively new. In this process, ultrasound waves are highly concentrated to destroy diseased tissue, tumor cells in particular, and render them harmless. Focused ultrasound benefits patients in several ways. The therapy is completely non-invasive and can be performed without anesthesia, and there are no operation wounds.