Genome

  • Cortisol excess hits natural DNA process and mental health hard

    Camilla Glad. Photo: Rickard Dahlén

    High concentrations of the stress hormone, Cortisol, in the body affect important DNA processes and increase the risk of long-term psychological consequences. These relationships are evident in a study from the Sahlgrenska Academy on patients with Cushing’s Syndrome, but the findings also open the door for new treatment strategies for other stress-related conditions such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress. “If these results can be verified and repeated in other studies, they would have significance for future possibilities for treating stress-induced psychological consequences,” says Camilla Glad, postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition.

  • Genome-based diets maximise growth, fecundity, and lifespan

    Researchers use the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster for their studies on genome-based diet. Dr. Sebastian Grönke / Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing

    A moderate reduction in food intake, known as dietary restriction, protects against multiple ageing-related diseases and extends life span, but can also supress growth and fertility. A research group from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne has now developed a diet based on the model organism’s genome, which enhances growth and fecundity with no costs to lifespan. What is the best path to a long and healthy life? Scientists had a relatively simple answer for many years: less food. But it turned out that this could have unpleasant consequences. Experiments showed that putting flies or mice on diet could impair their development and fecundity. How could we take advantage of the beneficial effects of dieting, and at the same time avoid the damaging effects?

  • Machine Learning Makes Proteomics Research More Effective

    The authors Mathias Wilhelm, Tobias Schmidt and Siegfried Gessulat. Image: A. Eckert / TUM

    Using artificial intelligence, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in making the mass analysis of proteins from any organism significantly faster than before and almost error-free. This new approach is set to provoke a considerable change in the field of proteomics, as it can be applied in both basic and clinical research.

  • Pioneering Biologists Create a New Crop Through Genome Editing

    The new cultivated tomato (right) has a variety of domestication features which distinguish it from the wild plant (left). Photo: Agustin Zsögön/Nature Biotechnology

    For the first time, researchers from Brazil, the USA and Germany have created, within a single generation, a new crop from a wild plant – the progenitor of our modern tomato – by using a modern process of genome editing. Starting with a “wild tomato” they have, at the same time, introduced a variety of crop features without losing the valuable genetic properties of the wild plant. Prof. Jörg Kudla from the University of Münster is involved in the study. The results have been published in the current issue of “Nature Biotechnology” (Advance Online Publication).

  • Predictable genetic interactions

    Lead author Mato Lagator in the lab preparing E.coli bacteria to test the interactions between mutations. IST Austria/Lisa Cichocki

    Researchers at IST Austria develop a model to predict how genetic interactions impact gene expression for the first time│ Study published in eLife. Even though we know the sequence of the entire human genome, scientist cannot determine what a particular person will look like. Part of the reason why we cannot read a genome like a book is because the genes, and individual base pairs within genes, interact with each other in many ways. This makes it hard to predict what different genetic combinations will result in.

  • Transfecting cells gently – the LZH presents a GNOME prototype at the Labvolution 2017

    GNOME laser transfection can continuously achieve high vitality rates of over 80% in primary cells (here: cortical neurons). Photo: LZH

    Transfecting a larger number of cells gently and efficiently – this is possible using the GNOME technology of the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH). This technology is especially suitable for high throughput screening. For the first time, the LZH will be presenting this innovative technology at the Labvolution 2017 at the Pavilion of the State of Lower Saxony (hall 19/20, stand C80).