Fluorescence

  • A Burst of ”Synchronous” Light

    Superlattices under the microscope (white light illumination). Empa

    Excited photo-emitters can cooperate and radiate simultaneously, a phenomenon called superfluorescence. Researchers from Empa and ETH Zurich, together with colleagues from IBM Research Zurich, have recently been able to create this effect with long-range ordered nanocrystal superlattices. This discovery could enable future developments in LED lighting, quantum sensing, quantum communication and future quantum computing. The study has just been published in the renowned journal "Nature".

  • Brought to Light – Chromobodies Reveal Changes in Endogenous Protein Concentration in Living Cells

    Antigen-Mediated-ChromoBody-Stabilization (AMCBS). NMI

    Scientists at the Natural and Medical Sciences Institute (NMI) in Reutlingen and the Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen have developed new molecular probes to monitor and quantify changes in the concentration of endogenous proteins by live-cell fluorescence microscopy. In a study now published in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, Keller et al. describe how fluorescently labeled intrabodies (so-called chromobodies) are stabilized in the presence of their target proteins. Based on this newly uncovered property of chromobodies, the authors present a broadly applicable strategy to optimize chromobodies in order to visualize and measure changes of endogenous target proteins within living cells. 

  • Closing In On the Secret of Possible New Enzymes

    The Peter Comba Research Group. © University of Heidelberg

    Researchers at Heidelberg University have gained new knowledge on the possible biological function of patellamides. In laboratory experiments, they were able to demonstrate that this natural product displays important catalytic activity in combination with copper(II). The team of scientists headed by chemist Prof. Dr Peter Comba developed a special method to determine whether this activity can also be observed in the patellamide-producing organisms. This means that stable copper(II) patellamide complexes could be confirmed in living cells – which would imply that these compounds can act as catalysts.

  • Deep Learning predicts hematopoietic stem cell development

    What are they going to be? Hematopoietic stem cells under the microscope: New methods are helping the Helmholtz scientists to predict how they will develop. Source: Helmholtz Zentrum München

    Autonomous driving, automatic speech recognition, and the game Go: Deep Learning is generating more and more public awareness. Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and their partners at ETH Zurich and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now used it to determine the development of hematopoietic stem cells in advance. In ‘Nature Methods’ they describe how their software predicts the future cell type based on microscopy images.

  • Goettingen Researchers Combine Light and X-ray Microscopy for Comprehensive Insights

    STED image (left) and x-ray imaging (right) of the same cardiac tissue cell from a rat. University of Goettingen

    Researchers at the University of Goettingen have used a novel microscopy method. In doing so they were able to show both the illuminated and the "dark side" of the cell. The results of the study were published in the journal Nature Communications. (pug) The team led by Prof. Dr. Tim Salditt and Prof. Dr. Sarah Köster from the Institute of X-Ray Physics "attached" small fluorescent markers to the molecules of interest, for example proteins or DNA. The controlled switching of the fluorescent dye in the so-called STED (Stimulated Emission Depletion) microscope then enables highest resolution down to a few billionth of a meter.

  • International Stir Caused by Unusual Study on Noble Gases

    Nobel gases are used as light sources in fluorescent tubes. Foto: thauwald-pictures/fotolia.com

    Experts acclaim the research findings of the team of authors from Bremen, Leipzig, Wuppertal and the USA as a scientific breakthrough in basic research. The world leading journal “Applied Chemistry” features the study on its cover page.

    Reactions with noble gases have long been a cause of fascination for chemists. The substances used as light sources in fluorescent tubes, for instance, are extremely slow to react in respect of their chemical reactions – they are therefore called “noble”. A newly published study in this area of basic research is currently causing quite a stir in expert circles.

  • Nanoparticles Help with Malaria Diagnosis – New Rapid Test in Development

    Fluorescent nanoparticles, excited by UV light. © Photo K. Dobberke für Fraunhofer ISC

    The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

  • Neues Kamerasystem zeigt Tumore farbig an

    Links: Die neue Kamera zeigt mit Fluoreszenzfarbstoffen eingefärbte Strukturen an, in diesem Fall in grün und blau. Quelle: Fraunhofer IPA

    Tumore zu entfernen, ist für Chirurgen ein besonders schwieriges Unterfangen. Denn die betroffenen Stellen sind vom gesunden Gewebe kaum zu unterscheiden. Das Fraunhofer IPA hat ein Kamerasystem entwickelt, das Fluoreszenz oder Farbe detektiert. Auf diese Weise kann der Chirurg die angefärbten Tumore besser sehen und gezielter behandeln. Um Tumore zu untersuchen, schaut sich der Chirurg die betroffenen Stellen zunächst mit dem Endoskop an. Allerdings sei es selbst mit geschultem Auge und Spezialausbildung in vielen Fällen äußert schwierig zu erkennen, wo der Krebs anfängt und wo er endet, kritisiert Nikolas Dimitriadis, Wissenschaftler der Fraunhofer-Projektgruppe für Automatisierung in der Medizin und Biotechnologie PAMB in Mannheim.

  • Neural Networks Let Microscopists See More

    Noisy fluorescence microscopy image of cell nuclei of the planaria Schmidtea mediterranea (top) and the result after applying CARE (bottom). © Martin Weigert, Tobias Boothe, and Florian Jug / MPI-CBG, CSBD

     

    Modern microscopes can record many hours of 3D time-lapse movies of every cell as an organism develops. Just as for regular photography, fluorescence microscopy requires enough light to avoid dark and noisy images. However, the light necessary for such movies can easily reach levels that harm frequently studied model organisms such as worms, fish, and mice. To date, the only option to avoid this “ultimate sunburn” is to record shorter movies or reduce the amount of light used. As a consequence, many biologists are forced to work with very noisy images that are hard to interpret. Researchers around Florian Jug and Eugene W. Myers at the Center for Systems Biology Dresden (CSBD) and the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG), have now developed a content-aware image restoration method – CARE – that solves this dilemma.

  • New Mouse Model Makes Stem Cells Light up Green

    Scientists at the University of Bonn have found a way to specifically mark multipotent stromal cells. These cells therefore light up green in the microscope image. (c) Martin Breitbach/Uni Bonn

    Multipotent stromal cells have long been a hot topic in medical research. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now found a way to specifically mark these stem cells. This makes it possible to analyze their distribution pattern and their function in living organisms. The study, which included researchers from Oxford University, Tsukuba University and the Karolinska Institute Stockholm, is now being published in the journal “Cell Stem Cell”. 

  • Rabies viruses reveal wiring in transparent brains

    Transplant of human neurons in the hippocampus of a mouse: the surrounding nerve cells in the mouse brain have connected to engrafted neurons.  © Photo: Dr. Jonas Doerr

    Scientists under the leadership of the University of Bonn have harnessed rabies viruses for assessing the connectivity of nerve cell transplants: coupled with a green fluorescent protein, the viruses show where replacement cells engrafted into mouse brains have connected to the host neural network. A clearing procedure which turns the brain into a ‘glass-like state’ and light sheet fluorescence microscopy are used to visualize host-graft connections in a whole-brain preparation. The approach opens exciting prospects for predicting and optimizing the ability of neural transplants to functionally integrate into a host nervous system. The results have been published in “Nature Communications”.