Coatings

  • 10nm Pattern Generation Using Thermal Scanning Probe Lithography Enabled by Simplified Materials and Processes

    High resolution metal lines fabricated by means of lit-off process. (c) PiBond Oy

    Thermal scanning probe lithography (tSPL) has been used to create patterns with sub-20 nm half pitch resolution. Pattern generation uses a thermally sensitive resist and spin coatable hard mask materials to transfer the resist patterns. Spin coatable materials permit users of tSPL to reduce time and cost of the patterning process.

  • atmoFlex – Fraunhofer FEP enhances its facilities for coating plastic films

    1,200 mm-wide slot die for contactless coating of fragile substrate can be heated up to 50°C. © Fraunhofer FEP, Fotograf: Jürgen Lösel

    A leader in thin-film technology R&D, the Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP in Dresden, Germany, has significantly enhanced its capabilities. Scientists will be explaining and illustrating the new opportunities using a model of the new coating machine atmoFlex at their trade fair booth during ICE 2017 in Munich/Germany (Hall A5, booth 1157), from March 21 – 23.

    Fraunhofer FEP has been pushing the technology development for thin-film coatings on plastic film for years. The basis for these advances has been its roll-to-roll process lines that facilitate the development of coating systems, from lab-scale to prototype samples, up through initial pilot manufacturing for industrial applications.

  • Coating Free-form Surfaces on Large Optical Components

    1-dimensional graded, nearly sinusoidal layer thickness curve on glass substrate (450x450 mm). © Fraunfofer FEP

    The business unit Precision Coatings at Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP has special expertise in developing deposition processes for high-precision coating systems on optical components. Now, a coating technology for Deposition of laterally graded optical layers on 2D and in the future also on 3D substrates has been developed. The results will be presented at the 2nd OptecNet Annual Conference in Berlin, June 20-21, 2018.

  • Corrosion and Wear Protection: Economical, Environmentally Friendly and Extremely Fast

    With EHLA, metal protective layers can be applied with ultra-high-speed. Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany / Volker Lannert.

    Components are protected against corrosion and wear through hard chrome plating, thermal spraying, laser material deposition or other deposition welding techniques. However, there are downsides to these processes – for example, as of September 2017, chromium(VI) coatings will require authorization. Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen as well as the RWTH Aachen University have now developed an ultra-high-speed laser material deposition process, known by its German acronym EHLA, to eliminate these drawbacks. On May 30, 2017, the research team was awarded the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize for this work.

  • CVD Diamond Coating: New Innovative Process Improves the Adhesion of Diamond to Cemented Carbide

    The broken edge of a diamond-coated carbide component pretreated with the newly developed procedure, with significantly improved adhesion of the diamond layer. © Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM

    To reduce process costs in industrial parts manufacturing while simultaneously improving quality, the use of diamond-coated, cemented carbide cutting tools has increased. Adhesion of diamond coatings was previously problematic, particularly when processing composite or lightweight materials. Suitable pretreatment is therefore vital. Dr. Manuel Mee of the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM has developed a new pretreatment routine that increases the adhesion of CVD diamond to carbide: by combining several approaches into a single process, all factors which affect the adhesion of the coating can be taken into consideration, leading to a fundamental improvement of the adhesion.

  • Diamond Friction: Simulation Reveals Previously Unknown Friction Mechanisms at the Molecular Level

    Passivation of water-lubricated diamond surfaces by aromatic Pandey surface reconstruction (orange). Image: © Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM

    Diamond coatings help reduce friction and wear on tools, bearings, and seals. Lubricating diamond with water considerably lowers friction. The reasons for this are not yet fully understood. The Fraunhofer Institute for Material Mechanics IWM in Freiburg and the Physics Institute at the University of Freiburg have discovered a new explanation for the friction behavior of diamond surfaces under the influence of water. One major finding: in addition to the known role played by passivation of the surfaces via water-splitting, an aromatic passivation via Pandey reconstruction can occur. The results have been published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

  • Environmentally Friendly Alternative to Prohibited Hard Chrome Plating Using Chromium(VI)

    World premiere: EHLA system for Laser Material Deposition of piston rods having a length of up to ten meters. © Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany / Hornet Laser Cladding B.V., Lexmond, NL.

    The strict conditions on the use of chromium(VI) for corrosion and wear protection coatings, which will take effect in the EU in September 2017, hit the manufacturers of highly stressed metal components particularly hard. One such company is IHC Vremac Cylinders B.V. in the Dutch city of Apeldoorn. The hydraulic cylinders it manufactures, which often measure many meters in length, have to withstand rough maritime conditions for years. With its choice of an award-winning alternative to hard chrome plating, this Dutch manufacturer has become the first company in the world to coat its components using the EHLA technique developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen.

  • Environmentally Friendly Steel Coatings: Fraunhofer ILT Wins Steel Innovation Award

    On June 13, 2018, the Fraunhofer ILT team took 2nd place at the Steel Innovation Awards in Berlin in the “Steel in Research and Development” category for their EHLA process. © Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany.

    Once every three years, the German steel industry presents its Steel Innovation Awards. The purpose of this initiative is to recognize innovations that are helping to ensure this material remains a viable choice for the long term. The jury considers not just products made from steel, but also innovative processes such as Extreme High-speed Laser Material Deposition (EHLA). For the development of the EHLA process, researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen won the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize in 2017. On June 13, 2018, the researchers were honoured with the 2nd Prize of the Steel Innovation Award in the “Steel in Research and Development” category.

  • EU project INNOVIP: new technologies for long-lasting and cost-effective vacuum insulation panels

    Vacuum Insulation Panels. FIW München

    High-tech building insulation: EU research project INNOVIP to develop new technologies for long-lasting and cost-effective vacuum insulation panels. Munich – The demands from Brussels are ambitious: by 2050, office and private buildings in Europe must lower their CO2 footprint by around 80 percent, compared to 1990 levels (1). Optimal thermal insulation will play a key role in achieving this target. Vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) are particularly promising in this regard, but are still very expensive and difficult to work with. Moreover, to ensure a high level of market acceptance, the lifetime of the panels has to be improved.

  • FOSA LabX 330 Glass – Coating Flexible Glass in a Roll-to-Roll Process

    VON ARDENNE FOSA LabX 330 Glass - coating system for flexible glass. © VON ARDENNE Corporate Archive

    The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP and VON ARDENNE will intensify their cooperation in the field of the coating of flexible glass. Due to its properties, this new material is ideally suited as a substrate for various applications in flexible electronics. Since October 2016, the two partners have been operating the roll-to-roll coating system FOSA LabX 330 Glass together. This new, innovative machine was especially developed for processing flexible glass by the equipment manufacturer VON ARDENNE, which is based in Dresden, Germany. It is the first of its kind worldwide.

  • Fraunhofer IWS Dresden collaborates with a strong research partner in Singapore

    Laser wire build-up of an expansion nozzle. Photo: Fraunhofer IWS Dresden

    The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and the Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech) have signed a memorandum of understanding for international collaboration in the fields of laser-based additive manufacturing and diamond-like hard coating technology.

    SIMTech is a research institute under Singapore’s Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). The collaboration between Fraunhofer IWS and SIMTech started last year following Prof. Christoph Leyens, director and business unit manager Additive Manufacturing of the Fraunhofer IWS in Dresden, visit to SIMTech under its fellowship scheme. “With the signing of this memorandum of understanding, our collaboration will reach the next level of intensity” says Prof. Leyens, “For us, the collaboration with a world-leading institute in Singapore opens up new horizons in the important fields of additive manufacturing and coatings technology, both from a scientific and an application-oriented perspective.”

  • From the Lab on to the Ship: Environmentally-Friendly Removal of Biofouling

    Barnacles and muscles stuck to the ship’s hull can be brushed off easily from the new coating. The paintwork is not damaged. Photo/credit: Dr Martina Baum

    It is one of the shipping industry’s major problems: marine organisms like barnacles, algae or muscles quickly cover the hulls of ships and damage their paintwork. The so-called “biofouling” increases the ship’s weight and its flow resistance, causing greater fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. Those protective paints that are used around the world contain and release pollutants. A research team at Kiel University and the Phi-Stone AG, one of its spin-offs located in Kiel, have closely cooperated to develop an environmentally-friendly coating. This coating makes it harder for marine organisms to grow on the hulls and makes cleaning the ships easier.

  • Functional films and efficient coating processes

    Optical system for inline monitoring of the film thickness and degree of crosslinking  of organic coatings © Photo Fraunhofer IVV

    The Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging IVV together with the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP and the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB will present new developments in films and the efficient control of coating processes at the upcoming International Converting Exhibition Europe ICE being held in Munich from 21 - 23 March 2017. Under the motto "Functional films – efficient coating processes", emphasis will be put on new film functionalities and accelerated test methods (Hall A5, Stand 1031).

  • Hannover Messe: Improved corrosion protection with flake-type zinc-phosphate particles

    Because of the disordered arrangement of the flakes, they can not run through the sandglass like spheric particles do. Source: Ollmann

    To prevent corrosive substances from penetrating into materials, a common method is to create an anti-corrosion coating by applying paint layers of zinc-phosphate particles. Now, research scientists at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials developed a special type of zinc-phosphate particles: They are flake-like in shape because they are ten times as long as they are thick. Large quantities of steel are used in architecture, bridge construction and ship-building. Structures of this type are intended to be long-lasting. Furthermore, even in the course of many years, they should not lose any of their qualities regarding strength and safety. For this reason, the steel plates and girders used must have extensive and durable protection against corrosion.

  • Hannover Messe: Inkjet process to print flexible touchscreens cost-efficiently

    Printed, flexible touchscreen. Source: INM

    INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials will be demonstrating flexible touch screens, which are produced by printing recently developed nanoparticle inks on thin plastic foils. These inks composed predominantly of transparent, conductive oxides (TCOs) are suitable for a one-step printing process. Flexible smart phones are desirable for a lot of users. Up to now the displays of the innumerable phones and pods are rigid and do not yield to the anatomical forms adopted by the people carrying them. By now it is no longer any secret that the big players in the industry are working on flexible displays. INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials shows, how they might become reality in the near future: At this year’s Hannover Messe, INM will be presenting suitable coatings for cost-efficient inkjet processes at the stand B46 in hall 2 from on 24 April to 28 April.

  • High conductive foils enabling large area lighting

    Roll-to-roll processed OLED on SEFAR TCS Planar substrates. © Fraunhofer FEP, Photographer: Jürgen Lösel

    Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP as one of the leading partners for research and development for surface technologies and organic electronics and Sefar AG, a leading manufacturer of precision fabrics from monofilaments developed a roll-to-roll processed large area flexible OLED during a joint project.

    Large area OLED lighting is an attractive technology for various applications in residential, architectural and automotive lighting segments. Sefar developed high conductive, transparent and flexible electrode substrates enabling large area homogenous lighting which is demonstrated by Fraunhofer FEP in a roll-to-roll (R2R) process.

  • High-performance Roll-to-Roll processing for flexible electronics

    Ultra-thin flexible Corning® Willow® Glass with a glass thickness of 100 μm © Fraunhofer FEP, Photographer: Jürgen Lösel

    Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP as one of the leading partners for research and development for surface technologies and organic electronics presents a roll of flexible thin glass, which is coated with highly conductive ITO continuously on 100 meters with roll-to-roll technology for the first time at FLEX 2017, from June 19 – 22, 2017 in Monterey, USA at booth no. 1004.

  • Launch of project ECO COM'BAT: Sustainable energy storage with high-voltage batteries

    Efficient lithium-ion pouch cell with the base materials. © K. Selsam-Geißler, Fraunhofer ISC

    Cruising range is one of the greatest challenges for the rapid implementation of electromobility in Europe. Ten partners from industry and research organizations now join forces in the EU funded project ECO COM'BAT, coordinated by the Fraunhofer Project Group Materials Recycling and Resource Strategies, part of the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC, to develop the next generation of lithium-ion batteries – the high-voltage battery. Better performance is not the only goal for the new battery. Compared to conventional batteries the new type should be more powerful and even more sustainable due to the substitution of conventional, often expensive, rare or even critical materials.

  • MMA Helps Manufacturers of Medical Device Components to Introduce their Products into ASEAN Market

    24-channel microscope "zenCELL owl”. InnoME GmbH

    From August 29 to 31, 2018, the Medical Manufacturing Asia (MMA) takes place as a supplier trade fair in Singapore. The IVAM Microtechnology Network presents a joint pavilion at the fair. Here, international developers and manufacturers of medical device components present current technologies and products. The fair will be accompanied by a presentation forum, B2B meetings and a company visit.

  • Molecular Multitools

    Schematic illustration of the visible-light-controlled reconfigurable surface functions. © MPI-P

    The functionalization of surfaces with different physical or chemical properties is a key challenge for many applications. For example, the defined structuring of a surface with hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas can be used for the separation of emulsions, like water and oil. However, the creation of user-defined surface properties is a challenge. Researches from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz (MPI-P), the University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei and the University of Electronic Science and Technology in Chengdu (China) have now developed surfaces that can easily be patterned with different functionalities using visible light.