The DGP awards the Technology Transfer Prize 2017/2018 jointly to  Nanoscribe GmbH, as well as the Institute for Nanotechnology and Innovation and Relation Management of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). © DPG 2016

The DPG Technology Transfer Prize 2017/2018 will be awarded jointly to Nanoscribe GmbH, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, and the Institute for Nanotechnology and Innovation and Relation Management at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The three institutions received the award for the outstanding transfer of scientific findings in the field of 3D laser lithography into commercial exploitation - in particular for the fabrication of micro- and nanostructures.

In SrCo₂V₂O₈ the cobalt ions (CO²⁺) form in the interior of a chain of edges-linked oxygen octahedra a quasi-one-dimensional electron spin chain with spin S = ½. © Universität Augsburg/IfP/EP V

The synthesis of quasi one-dimensional magnets and their investigation by means of optical spectroscopy in extremely high magnetic fields led to success. Augsburg /AL/KPP - “Bethe strings” are excitations of strongly bound electron spins in one-dimensional quantum spin systems. These quantum spin states are named after the physicist Hans Bethe, who first described them theoretically in 1931.

Impressions of the exhibition for nanotechnology “nano tech” 2017. IVAM

The nano tech in Tokyo, the world's largest international exhibition for nanotechnology, once again attracts nanotechnology experts around the world. From February 14-16, 2018 more than 50,000 international visitors are expected to visit the Big Sight exhibition center in Tokyo.

Focal points of the nano tech 2018 are innovative advanced materials such as graphene and fullerenes, nanoparticles, nano coatings, nano inks and nano composites, carbon nanotubes, photonic, magnetic and biocompatible materials as well as nano-based fabrication technologies and evaluation and measurement applications down to the nanometer scale.

A physical realization of a thermal rectifier. © Shabir Barzanjeh, André Xuereb, Matteo Aquilina, 2018

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters. Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature increase due to the thermal noise that is produced by environment and or other components nearby.