CRISPR-UMI relies on the addition of a high complexity barcoding system – or Unique Molecular Identifier (UMI) – that marks each single mutant clone and allows its tracking within a population. (c) Philipp Zaufel, maximcapra.com

CRISPR-UMI, a novel method developed at IMBA, facilitates extremely robust and sensitive screens by tracking single mutants within a population of cells. “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts” is an adage that applies to many concepts in biology. For genetic screens, however, it is the individual parts, i.e. the individual cells, that are the focus of the next generation of CRISPR-Cas9 screens. Single mutants within a population reveal new findings that could revolutionise target discovery and offer fresh insights into the biological systems of cell differentiation and cancer.

An aim of the project eTRANSAFE is to analyze whether and to what extent preclinical data enable reliable prediction of clinical findings. Felix Schmitt, Fraunhofer ITEM

(Hannover/Germany) The 40 million euro European project eTRANSAFE, to be kicked off at the end of September 2017, is aimed at speeding up the development of better and safer medicines for patients. Coordinated by the Fundació Institut Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques (IMIM) and led by the pharmaceutical company Novartis, the project consortium is a public-private partnership of eight academic institutions, six SMEs, and twelve pharmaceutical companies. One of the project partners is Fraunhofer ITEM.

Dosimetry for selective internal radiation therapy of the liver. © Photo Fraunhofer MEVIS

Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithms enhance the application of radioactive microspheres in cancer treatment. Radioembolization is a therapy method used for liver tumors that are uncurable with surgery or chemotherapy. Thorough development of an individual planning is important for successful treatment. Within the SIRTOP project, the Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS in Bremen is developing sophisticated computer algorithms to make therapy planning faster and more precise. The research team will present their initial results at several upcoming conferences. 

Like a spaceship, the complex sugar molecule (coloured) lands exactly on the tumor protein galectin-1, which here looks like a meteorite and is shown in black and white. Picture: Workgroup Seibel, VCH-Wiley

Scientists from the University of Würzburg have synthesized a complex sugar molecule which specifically binds to the tumor protein Galectin-1. This could help to recognize tumors at an early stage and to combat them in a targeted manner. Galectins are a family of proteins that have become a promising source of cancer research in recent years. A representative thereof is galectin-1. It sits on the surface of all human cells; on tumor cells, however, it occurs in enormous quantities. This makes it an interesting target for diagnostics and therapy.

feed-image Feed Entries