Quantum circuit, developed at the Walther-Meissner-Institut (WMI), which can be used to produce restricted microwave states. Image: Andreas Battenberg / TUM

An international team headed by physicists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has, for the first time ever, experimentally implemented secure quantum communication in the microwave band in a local quantum network. The new architecture represents a crucial step on the road to distributed quantum computing. As of yet, there are no universal quantum computers in the world. But for the first time, an international team led by TUM physicists Rudolf Gross, Frank Deppe and Kirill Fedorov has successfully implemented secure quantum communication in a local network – via a 35-centimeter superconducting cable.

By applying a magnetic field, the bending beam vibrates. A permanently electrically charged electret (blue) pulls the bending beam. This way his vibrance gets stronger. Copyright: Marleen Schweichel

 

Electrical signals measurements such as the ECG (electrocardiogram) can show how the human brain or heart works. Next to electrical signals magnetic signals also reveal something about the activity of these organs. They could be measured with little effort and without skin contact. But the especially weak signals require highly sensitive sensors. Scientists from the Collaboraive research Center 1261 "Magnetoelectric Sensors" at Kiel University have now developed a new concept for cantilever sensors, with the future aim of measuring these low frequencies of heart and brain activity. The extremely small, energy-efficient sensors are particularly well-suited for medical applications or mobile microelectronics. This is made possible by the use of electrets. Such material is permanently electrically charged, and is also used in microphones for hearing aids or mobile phones. The research team presented its sensor concept in a special edition of the renowned journal Nano Energy.

 

The authors Mathias Wilhelm, Tobias Schmidt and Siegfried Gessulat. Image: A. Eckert / TUM

Using artificial intelligence, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in making the mass analysis of proteins from any organism significantly faster than before and almost error-free. This new approach is set to provoke a considerable change in the field of proteomics, as it can be applied in both basic and clinical research.

The codon-specific elongation model (COSEM) simulates protein synthesis. Scientific Reports

In a research co-operation, researchers of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI) have developed a mathematical model which allows more accurate forecasts and improved output in the biotechnology-based protein synthesis in host organism. The new method offers many and varied applications in biotechnology including the development of vaccines. Scientific Reports has published an article on the results in its online version of 17 May 2019.