Superlattices under the microscope (white light illumination). Empa

Excited photo-emitters can cooperate and radiate simultaneously, a phenomenon called superfluorescence. Researchers from Empa and ETH Zurich, together with colleagues from IBM Research Zurich, have recently been able to create this effect with long-range ordered nanocrystal superlattices. This discovery could enable future developments in LED lighting, quantum sensing, quantum communication and future quantum computing. The study has just been published in the renowned journal "Nature".

Steffen Schmidt-Eberle and colleague Thomas Stolz working in their lab at Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics to gain fundamental insights for future quantum technologies. Photo: Lukas Husel / MPQ

Recent advances in quantum research have made it possible to map the strong interactions between Rydberg atoms on optical photons by making use of electro-magnetically induced transparency. Now, for the first time, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have exploited this mechanism to implement a photon-photon quantum gate. This all-optical logic gate provides precise control over single photons, and its realization opens a route to new applications in quantum communication and quantum networks.

Rubidium atoms are excited to their Rydberg states in a glass cell at room temperature. The volume between the glass plates is so thin that colored interference rings are visible to the naked eye. Universität Stuttgart/Max Kovalenko

Researchers of the Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology IQST at the 5th Institute of Physics at the University of Stuttgart (Head: Prof. Tilman Pfau) have developed a novel, promising variant of a light source for the smallest possible energy packages - a so-called single-photon source. Their work has been published in the latest issue of the journal Science.*

Schematic representation of the new spin qubit consisting of four electrons (red) with their spins (blue) in their semiconductor environment (grey). Copyright: Maximilian Russ/Guido Burkard

A theoretical concept to realize quantum information processing has been developed by Professor Guido Burkard and his team of physicists at the University of Konstanz. The researchers have found ways to shield electric and magnetic noise for a short time. This will make it possible to use spins as memory for quantum computers, as the coherence time is extended and many thousand computer operations can be performed during this interval. The study was published in the current issue of the journal “Physical Review Letters”.