Quantum error correction protocols detect and correct processing errors in trapped-ion quantum computers. IQOQI Innsbruck/Harald Ritsch

A study carried out by an international team of researchers and published in the journal Physical Review X shows that ion-trap technologies available today are suitable for building large-scale quantum computers. The scientists introduce trapped-ion quantum error correction protocols that detect and correct processing errors. In order to reach their full potential, today’s quantum computer prototypes have to meet specific criteria: First, they have to be made bigger, which means they need to consist of a considerably higher number of quantum bits. Second, they have to be capable of processing errors.

Sketch of an optimized optical antenna: A cavity is located inside; the electrical fields during operation are coded by the colour scale. Current patterns are represented by green arrows. Picture: Thorsten Feichtner

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network. Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor Gerhard Rempe at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ) have now achieved a major breakthrough: they demonstrated the long-lived storage of a photonic qubit on a single atom trapped in an optical resonator.

The tip of the STM (yellow) assumes the role of a hard drive’s reading and writing head for the molecule attached to the copper nitride surface (black). Figure/Copyright: Manuel Gruber

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

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14 German companies and organizations have combined forces in TACNET 4.0 - Tactile Internet, a project to create a standard system for real time industrial communications. The so called "tactile internet," based on 5G wireless technology, is being further developed with the support of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in this project for the digitalization of production and robotics. Focusing on the needs of the market, the project serves as a basis for a wide range of industrial applications. The project is coordinated by the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), together with Nokia Bell Labs.