Simulation

Simulation is some kind of program that is made to look, feel, or behave like something else especially so that it can be studied or used to train people.

  • Calculating Quietness

    Perforated sound absorbers for engines. Figure: Schmidt/MATHEON

    Noise bothers people and can cause illness. Researchers are working to dampen the sound directly at the source, for example through perforated walls in engines. Scientists around junior-group leader Dr. Kersten Schmidt from the Berlin research center MATHEON have now developed mathematical models helping to simulate and optimize sound emitters like this considerably faster and with a lower computational effort than before. The engine manufacturers in the region will also benefit from this.

  • Der Quanten-Strom im Graphen

    Wenn der Strom in Portionen fließt: Berechnungen der TU Wien liefern Erkenntnisse über die Quanten-Eigenschaften des Kohlenstoff-Materials Graphen.

  • Exotischer Materiezustand: "Flüssige" Quantenspins bei tiefsten Temperaturen beobachtet

    Exotischer Materiezustand Flüssige Quantenspins bei tiefsten Temperaturen beobachtet | Im Kristallgitter von Kalzium-Chrom-Oxid gibt es sowohl ferromagnetische Wechselwirkungen (grüne und rote Balken) als auch antiferromagnetische (blaue Balken). Abbildung: HZB

    Ein Team am HZB hat experimentell eine sogenannte Quanten-Spinflüssigkeit in einem Einkristall aus Kalzium-Chrom-Oxid nachgewiesen. Dabei handelt es sich um einen neuartigen Materiezustand. Das Besondere an dieser Entdeckung: Nach gängigen Vorstellungen war das Quantenphänomen in diesem Material gar nicht möglich. Nun liegt eine Erklärung vor. Die Arbeit erweitert das Verständnis von kondensierter Materie und könnte auch für die zukünftige Entwicklung von Quantencomputern von Bedeutung sein. Die Ergebnisse sind nun in Nature Physics veröffentlicht.

  • First experimental quantum simulation of particle physics phenomena

    First experimental quantum simulation of particle physics phenomena | Physicists have simulated the creation of elementary particle pairs out of the vacuum by using a quantum computer. IQOQI/Harald Ritsch

    Physicists in Innsbruck have realized the first quantum simulation of lattice gauge theories, building a bridge between high-energy theory and atomic physics. In the journal Nature, Rainer Blatt‘s and Peter Zoller’s research teams describe how they simulated the creation of elementary particle pairs out of the vacuum by using a quantum computer.

  • Flow at the nanoscale: what stops a drop and keeps nanobubbles alive

    All of us have seen it: a raindrop running down the windowpane. It stops at a certain point, is met by a second raindrop and the two join up before continuing to run down the pane. Very small irregularities or dirt on the windowpane appear to stop the course of the raindrops. If the surface was entirely smooth and chemically clean, the raindrops would be able to flow unhindered. Surface defects such as small bumps and dimples as well as chemical contaminants stop the liquid drops.
    These are everyday phenomena everyone knows and can observe with the naked eye.

  • How nanoparticles flow through the environment

    Carbon nanotubes remain attached to materials for years while titanium dioxide and nanozinc are rapidly washed out of cosmetics and accumulate in the ground. Researchers from the National Research Programme "Opportunities and Risks of Nanomaterials" (NRP 64) have developed a new model to track the flow of the most important nanomaterials in the environment.

  • How to Program Materials

    Ali Gooneie looks at a sample from his most recent research project: electrically conductive polymers. The first calculations for his next project are sketched out on the blackboard. Empa

    Can the properties of composite materials be predicted? Empa scientists have mastered this feat and thus can help achieve research objectives faster. This leads, for instance, to better recycling techniques and electrically conductive synthetic materials for the solar industry. Ali Gooneie simulates on his computer what holds the world together right at its very core: atoms, molecules, molecular chains and bundles – then lumps and fibers, which emerge thereof. With his calculations, the Empa researcher can also explain properties we can feel with our fingertips: smooth and rough surfaces, flexible and rigid materials, heat-conductive substances and insulators.

  • Machine Learning to Increase Biotechnology-based Protein Production

    The codon-specific elongation model (COSEM) simulates protein synthesis. Scientific Reports

    In a research co-operation, researchers of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI) have developed a mathematical model which allows more accurate forecasts and improved output in the biotechnology-based protein synthesis in host organism. The new method offers many and varied applications in biotechnology including the development of vaccines. Scientific Reports has published an article on the results in its online version of 17 May 2019.

  • New Test Rig Components for Faster Development and Validation

    Prototype of a mount with tunable stiffness. Photo: Fraunhofer LBF/Raapke

    Numerical simulations have massively accelerated product development over the past few decades. A variety of scenarios can be tested in a short time and the number of necessary prototypes has been steadily reduced. Nevertheless, physical tests will not lose significance. Numerical models must be validated and approval testing must be carried out. In the project “Digitization in Testing Technology”, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability LBF have developed tunable test rig components and a mechanical hardware-in-the-loop approach. The Results will present at the Automotive Testing Expo in Stuttgart, May 21-23, 2019 in hall 8, booth 8052.

  • Quantum Simulation 2.0: Atoms Chat Long Distance

    In an international first, a research team of experimental physicists led by Francesca Ferlaino and theoretical physicists led by Peter Zoller has measured long-range magnetic interactions between ultracold particles confined in an optical lattice. Their work, published in Science, introduces a new control knob to quantum simulation.

  • Quantum Simulation More Stable Than Expected

    Digital quantum simulation is intrinsically much more robust than what one might expect from known error bounds on the global many-body wave function. IQOQI Innsbruck/Harald Ritsch

    A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation within reach on quantum devices available today.
    Quantum computers promise to solve certain computational problems exponentially faster than any classical machine. “A particularly promising application is the solution of quantum many-body problems utilizing the concept of digital quantum simulation”, says Markus Heyl from Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex in Dresden, Germany. “Such simulations could have a major impact on quantum chemistry, materials science and fundamental physics.”

  • Spinströme: Riesengroß und ultraschnell

    Spinströme: Riesengroß und ultraschnell Der Laserpuls trifft auf Nickel (grün). Elektronen, deren Spin nach oben zeigt (rot) wechseln in das Silizium (gelb). Aus dem Silizium wechseln Elektronen beider Spinrichtungen zurück. Abbildung: TU Wien

    Mit einer neuen Methode der TU Wien lassen sich extrem starke Spinströme herstellen. Sie sind wichtig für die Spintronik, die unsere herkömmliche Elektronik ablösen könnte.

  • Surface wetting – tracking down the causes of polar hydrophobicity

    The question of whether a liquid beads or adheres to a surface plays a role in almost all branches of industry. Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM in Freiburg and ExxonMobil Research & Engineering in New Jersey have now developed a multiscale simulation method for predicting the wetting behavior of liquids on surfaces. In a recent edition of the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the research team applied this methodology to the previously unexplained phenomenon of polar hydrophobicity in fluorinated carbon surfaces.

  • Wie Materialoberflächen Zellgemeinschaften steuern

    Wie Materialoberflächen Zellgemeinschaften steuern picture 2 | Jenaer Forschern ist es gelungen, Polymeroberflächen von künstlichen Blutgefäßen so zu verändern, dass sie die Anhaftung der Blutplättchen und damit die Blutgerinnung wesentlich reduzieren. Foto: Jan-Peter Kasper/FSU

    Von der Natur inspiriert: Materialwissenschaftler der Uni Jena nutzen strukturierte Oberflächen, um medizinische Implantate sicherer zu machen