Radio Technology

  • Heart examinations: Miniature particle accelerator saves on contrast agents

    Prof. Franz Pfeiffer and PD Dr. Daniela Münzel at the miniature synchrotron Munich Compact Light Source (MuCLS). Heddergott / TUM

    The most prevalent method for obtaining images of clogged coronary vessels is coronary angiography. For some patients, however, the contrast agents used in this process can cause health problems. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now demonstrated that the required quantity of these substances can be significantly reduced if monoenergetic X-rays from a miniature particle accelerator are used.

    Soft tissues such as organs and blood vessels are nearly impossible to examine in X-ray images. To detect a narrowing or other changes in coronary blood vessels, patients are therefore usually injected with an iodinated contrast agent.

  • HI4PI: A new all-sky survey of neutral hydrogen

    The entire sky in the light of neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) as seen by the Parkes and Effelsberg radio telescope with the Milky Way in the middle. HI4PI Collaboration

    Two of the world's largest fully steerable radio telescopes, the 100-m dish at Effelsberg/Germany and the 64-m Parkes/Australia telescope, mapped the detailed structure of neutral hydrogen across the Northern and Southern hemispheres. Today, the complete survey, HI4PI, is released to the scientific community. It discloses a wealth of fine details of the large scale structure of the Milky Way's gas distribution. HI4PI is the product of a joined effort of astronomers of many countries and will be a mile stone for the decades to come.

  • Kristallzüchtung für komplexe Messaufgaben in der 5G-Technologie

    Kristallzüchtung für komplexe Messaufgaben in der 5G Technologie | Ferrit-Einkristalle für Hochfrequenz-Filterkomponenten gezüchtet aus Hochtemperaturlösungen Photo: INNOVENT e.V.

    Wissenschaftler der Industrieforschungseinrichtung INNOVENT züchten einkristalline Ferritmaterialien für die Mikrowellenmesstechnik. Erstmals werden damit durchgehende Empfangsbereiche von Signal- und Spektrumanalysatoren bis 85 GHz für anspruchsvolle Messaufgaben auf den Gebieten Automotive Radar, 5G und andere drahtlose Kommunikation realisiert.

  • RadarGlass: Functional Thin-film Structures for Integrated Radar Sensors

    With an electrically conductive thin film for headlamp covers, radar beams can be specifically shaped and directed.  © Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany.

    It is only an inconspicuous piece of paper, but it is an important milestone for autonomous driving: At the end of 2018 the three partners from the joint research project RadarGlass applied for a patent for an innovative radar system. The Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT from Aachen, the Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP from Dresden and the Institute of High Frequency Technology IHF of RWTH Aachen University have developed a coating process chain that enables radar sensors to be integrated in car headlights. After almost two years in development they have manufactured a working prototype.

  • Tune your radio: galaxies sing while forming stars

    The radio observations were based on the KINGFISH  sample of galaxies. The compilation shows composite infrared images of these galaxies created from Spitzer and Herschel observations. Maud Galametz

    A team of astronomers led by Fatemeh Tabatabaei from the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), including scientists from two Max Planck institutes (MPIfR, Bonn and MPIA, Heidelberg), has measured the radio emission for a large sample of galaxies with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope at different wavelengths. These galaxies were selected from the KINGFISH sample previously observed in the infrared with the Herschel satellite. This allows for the first time a comparative study of a total of 52 spiral galaxies. A reliable method could be established to determine the star formation rate exclusively from radio data without including other spectral regimes.

  • Ultrasound scalpel destroys liver tumors

    Doctors wish to use focused ultrasound to treat tumors in moving organs, such as the liver, shown here. Fraunhofer MEVIS

    Focused ultrasound can effectively destroy tumor cells. Until now, this method has only been used for organs such as the prostate and uterus. At the European Congress of Radiology, Fraunhofer researchers will present a method, developed as part of the TRANS-FUSIMO EU project, that enables focused ultrasound treatment of the liver, an organ that moves while breathing. In the future, this could enable treatment of certain liver tumors in a more gentle way.

    Ultrasound has long served as a diagnostic method. Its application as a form of therapy treatment, however, is relatively new. In this process, ultrasound waves are highly concentrated to destroy diseased tissue, tumor cells in particular, and render them harmless. Focused ultrasound benefits patients in several ways. The therapy is completely non-invasive and can be performed without anesthesia, and there are no operation wounds.