Piezo electronics

Piezo electronics refers to the devices using Piezoelectricity. These type of electric charge accumulates in certain materials in response to applied physical pressure. Examples of such materials are bones, DNA, proteins, crystals and some ceramics.

  • How nanotechnology is going to shape the electronics industry

    How nanotechnology is going to shape the electronics industry

     

    Electronics industry is one of the most interesting industry sector - if not the most interesting - for the application of nanotechnology. Already in present time, nanotechnology has already been introduced to the electronic industry. The critical length scale of the integrated circuits are already in nano scale. In this particular article few of the most popular product segments will be discussed.

  • New Material to Push the Boundaries of Silicon-Based Electronics

    Fraunhofer IAF develops electronic components and systems based on GaN. The image shows a processed GaN wafer. © Fraunhofer IAF

    The electronics market is growing constantly and so is the demand for increasingly compact and efficient power electronic systems. The predominant electronic components based on silicon will in foreseeable future no longer be able to meet the increasing industrial requirements.This is why scientists from the university of Freiburg, the Sustainability Center Freiburg and the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft have joined forces in order to explore a new material structure that may be better suited for future power electronics.

  • Organic–inorganic heterostructures with programmable electronic properties

    Calculated differential electrical potential induced by a supramolecular lattice of MBB-2 on graphene. Lohe

    Researchers from the University of Strasbourg & CNRS (France), in collaboration with the University of Mons (Belgium), the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (Germany) and the Technische Universität Dresden (Germany), have devised a novel supramolecular strategy to introduce tunable 1D periodic potentials upon self-assembly of ad hoc organic building blocks on graphene, opening the way to the realization of hybrid organic–inorganic multilayer materials with unique electronic and optical properties. These results have been published in Nature Communications.

  • Paving the way for a sounding photo book

    Dr. Georg Schmidt (left) and student Robert Eland check the quality of a test print at a roll-to-roll printing press in a laboratory of the Professorship of Printed Media Technology. Chemnitz University/Uwe Meinhold

    The Institute for Print and Media Technology at the Chemnitz University of Technology strives to reach the mass market with the printing of paper-speakers.

    If the Institute for Print and Media Technology at the Chemnitz University of Technology succeeds, the speaker of the future will be thin as paper and make photo books and packaging sound. In the laboratories of the Chemnitz researchers this is almost real as they already developed the numerously awarded “T-Book” – a large-scale photo book equipped with printed electronic – in 2015.