Nanoparticles

  • A better understanding of nanomaterials

     Petascale Simulations of Self-Healing Nanomaterials | by Argonne National Laboratory.

    In the past six years, the National Research Programme “Opportunities and Risks of Nanomaterials” (NRP 64) intensively studied the development, use, behaviour and degradation of engineered nanomaterials, including their impact on humans and on the environment.

    Twenty-three research projects on biomedicine, the environment, energy, construction materials and food demonstrated the enormous potential of engineered nanoparticles for numerous applications in industry and medicine. Thanks to these projects we now know a great deal more about the risks associated with nanomaterials and are therefore able to more accurately determine where and how they can be safely used.

  • An injectable guidance system for nerve cells

    Dr.-Ing. Laura De Laporte and PhD student Jonas Rose analyze the orientation of nerve cells (red) along the paths provided by gel rods (green). J. Hillmer, DWI

    In many tissues of the human body, such as nerve tissue, the spatial organization of cells plays an important role. Nerve cells and their long protrusions assemble into nerve tracts and transport information throughout the body. When such a tissue is injured, an accurate spatial orientation of the cells facilitates the healing process. Scientists from the DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials in Aachen developed an injectable gel, which can act as a guidance system for nerve cells. They recently published their results obtained from cell culture experiments in the journal ‚Nano Letters‘.

  • Applications of nanoparticles

    Nanoparticles are particles between 1 and 100 nanometers in size. In nanotechnology, a particle is defined as a small object that behaves as a whole unit with respect to its transport and properties. Particles are further classified according to diameter. Ultra fine particles are the same as nanoparticles and between 1 and 100 nanometers in size, fine particles are sized between 100 and 2,500 nanometers, and coarse particles cover a range between 2,500 and 10,000 nanometers. Nanoparticle research is currently an area of intense scientific interest due to a wide variety of potential applications in biomedical, optical and electronic fields.

  • Artificial DNA can Control Release of Active Ingredients from Drugs

    Prof. Oliver Lieleg uses models to visualize how nanoparticles are bound together by DNA fragments. Such connections may become the basis of drugs that release their active ingredients in sequence. Uli Benz / TUM

    A drug with three active ingredients that are released in sequence at specific times: Thanks to the work of a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), what was once a pharmacologist's dream is now much closer to reality. With a combination of hydrogels and artificial DNA, nanoparticles can be released in sequence under conditions similar to those in the human body.

  • Biological Risk Potential of Nanoparticles Studied

    Two CD34+ stem cells containing carbon nanoparticles (coloured magenta); the cell nuclei can be seen in blue. The researchers found that the nanoparticles are encapsulated in the cell lysosomes. HHU / Stefan Fasbender

    Publication in Scientific Reports

    Carbon nanoparticles are a promising tool for biomedical applications, for example for targeted transportation of biologically active compounds into cells. A team of researchers from the Physics, Medicine and Chemistry departments at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has now examined whether these particles are potentially dangerous for the organism and how cells cope with them once they have been incorporated. The findings of the interdisciplinary study have just been published in the journal Scientific Reports.

  • Block Copolymer Micellization as a Protection Strategy for DNA Origami

    Polyplex Abstract. cfaed

    Scientists from the Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden / TU Dresden and the University of Tokyo led by Dr. Thorsten-Lars Schmidt (cfaed) developed a method to protect DNA origami structures from decomposition in biological media. This protection enables future applications in nanomedicine or cell biology. The precise positioning of individual molecules with respect to one another is fundamentally challenging. DNA Nanotechnology enables the synthesis of nanometer-sized objects with programmable shapes out of many chemically produced DNA fragments.

  • Defense mechanism employed by algae can effectively inhibit marine fouling

    Illustration of the mode of action of bioinspired underwater paints: Like the natural enzyme vanadium bromoperoxidase cerium dioxide nanoparticles act as a catalyst for the formation of hypobromous acid from bromide ions (contained in sea water) and small amounts of hydrogen peroxide that are formed upon exposure to sun light yielding reduced biofilm formation. ill./©: Tremel research group, JGU

    Cerium dioxide nanoparticles block communication between bacteria and prevent the formation of biofilms

    Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have developed a method that reliably hinders hazardous seawater fouling and is effective, affordable, and easy on the environment. Fouling can occur, for example, as the result of the growth of bacteria, algae, or mollusks in harbor facilities, on boat hulls, and aquaculture netting. The resultant damage and consequential costs can be significant. It is estimated that these are equivalent to 200 billion dollars annually in the shipping industry alone.

  • Emission measurement: High-precision nanoparticle sensor developed

    Pic 1: The newly developed APCplus exhaust gas analyser has 20 per cent more power in order to count tiny particles faster and more accurately. ©AVL

    A research team based in Graz and Villach has developed an exhaust gas analyser that detects tiny particles faster and more accurately. CTR is the largest non-academic research centre in Carinthia and ranks among Austria’s leading research institutes in the area of smart sensors and systems integration. Its task and objective is to develop innovative sensor technologies (photonic, sensor, micro and nano systems as well as assembly, packaging and integration technologies) for industry and to integrate them in concrete applications. CTR research will therefore play a role in meeting society’s great challenges, such as energy, mobility, health, climate and security. Services range from feasibility studies, simulations and tests to prototyping and system design.

  • ERC Grant: Nanopartikel-Katalysatoren in Form bringen

    Beatriz Roldán Cuenya erhält eine renommierte Förderung vom Europäischen Forschungsrat. © RUB, Marquard

    Prof. Dr. Beatriz Roldán Cuenya von der Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) erhält einen der renommierten Consolidator Grants vom Europäischen Forschungsrat (ERC). Die Förderung beläuft sich auf zwei Millionen Euro für fünf Jahre. Die Wissenschaftlerin strebt an, mit den Mitteln neue Einblicke in die katalytischen Fähigkeiten von Nanopartikeln zu gewinnen, insbesondere wie sich Größe, Form und chemischer Zustand der Partikel während einer katalytischen Reaktion ändern. Winzige Metallpartikel, gerade einmal 1 bis 50 Nanometer groß, können als Katalysatoren für verschiedene Reaktionen dienen. Mehrere Parameter beeinflussen die katalytische Aktivität der Nanopartikel: ihre Größe und Form, das Trägermaterial, an das die Partikel gebunden sind, die Umgebung sowie der chemische Zustand der Partikel, also zum Beispiel ob sie als reines Metall oder als Oxid vorliegen.

  • FLASH observes exploding xenon nanoparticles

    With the bright X-ray flashes from FLASH the scientists made xenon clusters explode. The same flash allowed the researchers to record the structure of the cluster just before the explosion (top). With an ion spectrometer the scientists recorded the debris from the explosion (below). Credit: Daniela Rupp/Technical University of Berlin

    DESY’s X-ray laser offers new insights into the interaction between light and matter

  • Funding of Collaborative Research Center developing nanomaterials for cancer immunotherapy extended

    CRC 1066 logo. © CRC 1066

    Focus on the development of drug carriers from polymer chemicals for use in biological systems.

    The German Research Foundation (DFG) has agreed to fund the Mainz-based Collaborative Research Center (CRC) 1066 "Nanodimensional Polymer Therapeutics for Tumor Therapy" involved in the development of nanomaterials for cancer immunotherapy for another four years to the end of June 2021. This extension confirms Mainz as a major research hub in this field that requires input from both chemistry and biomedicine alike. Contributing to CRC 1066 are the Chemistry, Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Physics institutes at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) together with the Mainz University Medical Center and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz. The German Research Foundation will provide nearly EUR 13 million in financing over the next four years.

  • Hannover Messe: Inkjet process to print flexible touchscreens cost-efficiently

    Printed, flexible touchscreen. Source: INM

    INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials will be demonstrating flexible touch screens, which are produced by printing recently developed nanoparticle inks on thin plastic foils. These inks composed predominantly of transparent, conductive oxides (TCOs) are suitable for a one-step printing process. Flexible smart phones are desirable for a lot of users. Up to now the displays of the innumerable phones and pods are rigid and do not yield to the anatomical forms adopted by the people carrying them. By now it is no longer any secret that the big players in the industry are working on flexible displays. INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials shows, how they might become reality in the near future: At this year’s Hannover Messe, INM will be presenting suitable coatings for cost-efficient inkjet processes at the stand B46 in hall 2 from on 24 April to 28 April.

  • Körpereigene Nanopartikel als Transporter für Antibiotika

    Dr. Gregor Fuhrmann vom Helmholtz-Institut für Pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland (HIPS). G. Fuhrmann

    Neue BMBF-Nachwuchsgruppe um Gregor Fuhrmann erforscht, wie Medikamente gezielt zu Krankheitserregern im Körper geschleust werden können. Bakterien entwickeln zunehmend Resistenzen gegen die gängig eingesetzten Antibiotika – unter anderem als Folge der übermäßigen und zum Teil falschen Anwendung der Medikamente. Zudem haben Antibiotika häufig unangenehme Nebenwirkungen, da sie auch nützliche Bakterien abtöten. Der Pharmazeut Dr. Gregor Fuhrmann, Wissenschaftler am Helmholtz-Institut für Pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland (HIPS), möchte eine Technologie entwickeln, mit der Antibiotika im Körper gezielt zu den krankmachenden Bakterien transportiert werden.

  • MHH-Forscher reparieren geschädigte Blutgefäße mit Nanopartikel-Therapie

    Gefäße der Halsschlagader im Mausmodell. Quelle: MHH/Sonnenschein.

    MHH-Wissenschaftler fördern Heilung von Gefäßinnenwänden mit mikroRNAs / Veröffentlichung in der Fachzeitschrift Circulation. Blutgefäße sind innen mit einer schützenden Zellschicht, dem Endothel, ausgekleidet. Im Laufe des Lebens nutzt sich diese Schicht ab, die Gefäßewände verdicken und verkalken. Diese Veränderungen sind häufig Ursache für Erkrankungen wie Herzinfarkt oder Schlaganfall. Forscher der Medizinischen Hochschule Hannover (MHH) haben eine neue Therapie zur Heilung derart geschädigter Gefäße entwickelt.

  • Micromotors to open new horizons

    Electron microscope image of nanoscale Janus particles, which the Freigeist-group is going to test regarding their capacity as photocatalytic nanomotors. Juliane Simmchen

    Dr. Juliane Simmchen is going to explore new paths in chemistry. Being awarded a “Freigeist” Fellowship by the Volkswagen Foundation over 844.000 Euro for the next five years, Dr. Simmchen will establish her own junior research team at the Chair of Physical Chemistry (Prof. Alexander Eychmüller) at TU Dresden.

  • Mit Nanopartikeln gegen Gefäßverengungen

    V. l. : Stifter Dr. J. Breunig; Dr. H. B. Sager; Stifterin U. Breunig; Prof. Dr. H. Oelert, Dt. Stiftung für Herzforschung; Prof. Dr. G. Hasenfuß, Dt. Gesellschaft für Innere Medizin (DGIM). Foto: DGIM/Andreas Henn

    Neuer Therapieansatz zur Infarkt-Vorbeugung: Uta und Jürgen Breunig-Forschungspreis für Dr. Hendrik B. Sager (Deutsches Herzzentrum München)

  • Multi-organ platform for risk assessment of nanomaterials - Fraunhofer IBMT in project HISENTS

    Logo HISENTS

    European scientists develop a multimodular microchip platform for predicting the behaviour of nanomaterials in the body. Nanomaterials are already part of everyday life in our modern society. New applications, along with continuously rising quantities being produced, have led to an increased exposure to nanomaterials for both people and the environment. Predicting the behaviour of nanomaterials in organisms and extensive risk assessments are currently difficult because we are missing prediction models.

  • Nano particles as food additives: improving risk assessment

    Nanoparticles Reduce Inflammation after Injury. Photographer: Christine Pham, M.D., Washington University School of Medicine

    The anticaking agent E551 silicon dioxide, or silica, has been used widely in the food industry over the past 50 years, and was long thought to be quite safe. Now, however, researchers working on the National Research Programme “Opportunities and Risks of Nanomaterials” have discovered that these nanoparticles can affect the immune system of the digestive tract.

    It ensures that dry foods such as instant soup, instant coffee and spice powder retain good flow properties. “Synthetic amorphous silica”, the ultrafine powder which is obtained from quartz and bears the E number E551, has been used for around a century with no apparent cause for concern.

  • Nanodiscs: kleine Scheiben ganz groß

    Schematische Darstellung der Extraktion von Membranproteinen aus einer biologischen Membran (oben) unter Bildung von Nanodiscs (unten).

    Biophysiker, Biologen und Chemiker der Technischen Universität Kaiserslautern haben eine neue Art von Polymer/Lipid-Nanopartikeln entwickelt, mit denen Membranproteine im Reagenzglas und dennoch unter fast natürlichen Bedingungen untersucht werden können. Membranproteine spielen viele essenzielle Rollen beim Stoff- und Informationsaustausch zwischen und innerhalb von Zellen. Fehlfunktionen dieser wichtigen Klasse von Biomolekülen führen oft zu schweren Krankheiten, weshalb Membranproteine sowohl in der Grundlagen- als auch in der Wirkstoffforschung intensiv erforscht werden. Eine große Hürde für in-vitro-Untersuchungen - also Studien im Reagenzglas unter genau kontrollierten Bedingungen - sind dabei die hohen Anforderungen, die Membranproteine an ihre Umgebung stellen. Da diese Moleküle sich in Wasser und ähnlichen polaren Flüssigkeiten nicht lösen lassen, sind Forscherinnen und Forscher auf sogenannte „membranmimetische“ Systeme angewiesen, die die natürliche Lipidumgebung mit einer wasserabweisenden Schicht zwischen zwei wasserzugänglichen Grenzflächen möglichst gut nachbilden.

  • Nanomagnetism in X-ray Light

    Left: X-ray microscope image of a magnetic skyrmion. Right: Snapshot of the spin waves generated by a magnetic plate excited by microwaves (red: magnetization fully directed upward, blue: downward). © MPI-IS Stuttgart

    Today’s most advanced scanning X-ray microscope is operated by the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems at Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin.
    The MAXYMUS scanning X-ray microscope has its home at Berlin’s synchrotron radiation source BESSY II at Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin. Scientific support is provided by Dr. Markus Weigand from the “Modern Magnetic Systems” department at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) under the management of Professor Dr. Gisela Schütz. MAXYMUS stands for “MAgnetic X-raY Micro and UHV Spectroscope”. The special fea-tures of this scanning X-ray microscope are its variable specimen environment and broad application spectrum. “It makes it possible to observe ultra-fast processes at 20 times better resolution compared to an optical microscope,” explains Professor Dr. Gisela Schütz.