MEMS, NEMS, Nanoelectronics

MEMS stands for MicroElectroMechanical Systems. Currently, the word MEMS denotes man-made mechanical elements, sensors, actuators and electronics that that were produced using microfabrication technology and are integrated on a silicon substrate. Increasingly, the word MEMS is used for miniaturized devices that are based on Silicon technology or traditional precision engineering, chemical or mechanical.

NEMS stands for NanoElectroMechanical Systems. NEMS extend miniaturization further toward the ultimate limit of individual atoms and molecules. NEMS are man-made devices with functional units on a length scale between 1 and 100 nm. Some NEMS are based on the movement of nanometer-scale components.

Nanoelectronics extends miniaturization further toward the ultimate limit of individual atoms and molecules. On such a small scale, billions of devices could be integrated into a single nanoelectronical system. Nanoelectronics is often considered a disruptive technology because present candidates for nanoelectronical functional elements are significantly different from traditional transistors.

  • A signal boost for molecular microscopy

    A signal boost for molecular microscopy | Schematic illustration of the experiment. Graphic: MPQ, Laser Spectroscopy Division

    Cavity-enhanced Raman-scattering reveals information on structure and properties of carbon nanotubes. The inherently weak signals are amplified by using special micro cavities as resonator, giving a general boost to Raman spectroscopy as a whole.

  • Announcement: Free Webcast Today & Tomorrow: Nanosensor Manufacturing Workshop

    NNI Banner Logo. (c) NNI National Nanotechnology Initiative

    The NNI is a U.S. Government research and development (R&D) initiative involving 20 departments and independent agencies working together toward the shared vision of "a future in which the ability to understand and control matter at the nanoscale leads to a revolution in technology and industry that benefits society." The NNI brings together the expertise needed to advance this broad and complex field—creating a framework for shared goals, priorities, and strategies that helps each participating Federal agency leverage the resources of all participating agencies. With the support of the NNI, nanotechnology R&D is taking place in academic, government, and industry laboratories across the United States.

  • Applications of Graphene

    Application of Graphene

    In order to get introduced to Graphene, a good point of start would be Graphite. Graphite is a naturally-occurring form of crystalline carbon. It is a native element mineral found in metamorphic and igneous rocks. Regarding its composition, Graphite is a stack of carbon-atom layers.

  • Breakthrough in Graphene Research

    Different patterns are formed at the edges of nanographene. Zigzags are particularly interesting but unstable. FAU researchers have succeeded in creating stable layers of carbon with this pattern. Image: FAU/Konstantin Amsharov

    Graphene is a promising material for use in nanoelectronics. Its electronic properties depend greatly, however, on how the edges of the carbon layer are formed. Zigzag patterns are particularly interesting in this respect, but until now it has been virtually impossible to create edges with a pattern like this. Chemists and physicists at FAU have now succeeded in producing stable nanographene with a zigzag edge. Not only that, the method they used was even comparatively simple.

  • Europe's microtechnology industry is attuned to growth

    Economic development in the European microtechnology industry 2017-2019. IVAM Research

    Global economic, social and political developments as well as technological disruptions like the digital transformation do not leave the representatives of the European microtechnology industry unaffected. Nevertheless, growth forecasts for the next three years are distinctively positive. More than 80 percent of the companies expect to increase sales in the period from 2017 to 2019. The number of employees is also expected to rise in more than three-quarters of the companies. Increasing growth rates during the last four years are likely to have given rise to this optimism in the microtechnology industry: since 2013, the share of companies that have been able to increase their turnover and their number of employees has risen steadily.

  • Fraunhofer Researchers Develop High-Pressure Sensors for Extreme Temperature

    High temperature sensor for extrusion systems: SOI chips (left) and casing (right). Fraunhofer IZM

    Many industrial processes depend on exact pressure gauges. The SOI high-pressure sensors (silicon-on-insulator) developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration IZM makes this exact monitoring possible for processes operating at temperatures of up to 400° centigrade. The sensor promise an exceptionally long life as well as precision and efficiency. To keep up with technological requirements, future iterations of the sensors will be designed to withstand temperatures above 600° centigrade.

  • Germanium outperforms silicon in energy efficient transistors with n- und p- conduction

    Energy-efficient germanium nanowire transistor. Transmission electron microscope image of cross section.  NaMLab gGmbH

    NaMLab and cfaed reached an important breakthrough in the development of energy-efficient electronic circuits using transistors based on germanium

    A team of scientists from the Nanoelectronic Materials Laboratory (NaMLab gGmbH) and the Cluster of Excellence Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) at the Dresden University of Technology have demonstrated the world-wide first transistor based on germanium that can be programmed between electron- (n) and hole- (p) conduction.

  • Graphene electrodes offer new functionalities in molecular electronic nanodevices

    Molecules covalently attached to graphene are ideal candidates for electronic devices.  © Alexander Rudnev, University of Bern

    An international team of researchers led by the University of Bern and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has revealed a new way to tune the functionality of next-generation molecular electronic devices using graphene. The results could be exploited to develop smaller, higher-performance devices for use in a range of applications including molecular sensing, flexible electronics, and energy conversion and storage, as well as robust measurement setups for resistance standards.

  • How nanotechnology is going to shape the electronics industry

    How nanotechnology is going to shape the electronics industry

     

    Electronics industry is one of the most interesting industry sector - if not the most interesting - for the application of nanotechnology. Already in present time, nanotechnology has already been introduced to the electronic industry. The critical length scale of the integrated circuits are already in nano scale. In this particular article few of the most popular product segments will be discussed.

  • IHP brings INFOS conference to Germany

    Improvement of Silicon ICs by dielectrics: At the INFOS conference about 80 international scientists and engineers  will exchange their expertises about dielectrics and silicon circuits. © IHP/ 2017

    International conference unites engineers, technologists, material researchers, physicists and chemists in Potsdam - Their focus is on Insulating Films on Semicondoctors.

    Frankfurt (Oder). In June 2017, engineers, technologists, material researchers, physicists and chemists will meet in Potsdam. It is the first time that the international conference “INFOS” will be performed in Brandenburg. The Leibniz-institute IHP innovations for high performances microelectronics, located in Frankfurt (Oder), is organising the meeting, where experts from Europe, Asia and America will exchange their expertises on Insulating Films on Semicondoctors (INFOS).

  • Key Enabling Technologies at HANNOVER MESSE 2017

    Needle with very sharp tip end (

    Within the new focus area MICRO-NANO-AREA, the IVAM Microtechnology Network and Deutsche Messe will pool the “Key Enabling Technologies” Micro- and Nanotechnology, MEMS, Photonics and Advanced Materials. With these technologies, production of structures, components and devices is becoming more precise, more reliable, more flexible and faster. The following exhibitors will present their product innovations on-site.

  • Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

    Mapping electromagnetic waveforms | A three-dimensional depiction of the spatial variation of the optical electromagnetic field around a microantenna following excitation with terahertz pulse. The optical field is mapped with the aid of electron pulses. Graphic: Dr. Peter Baum

    Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second. With this new microscope researchers will be able to obtain fundamental insights of how transistors or optoelectronic switches operate at the microscopic level.

  • Molecular Lego for nanoelectronics

    Simulation result for formation of inversion channel (electron density) and attainment of threshold voltage (IV) in a nanowire MOSFET. Note that the threshold voltage for this device lies around 0.45V. © By Saumitra R Mehrotra & Gerhard Klimeck, modified by Zephyris - Own work

    The ability to assemble electronic building blocks consisting of individual molecules is an important objective in nanotechnology. An interdisciplinary research group at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) is now significantly closer to achieving this goal. The team of researchers headed by Prof. Dr. Sabine Maier, Prof. Dr. Milan Kivala and Prof. Dr. Andreas Görling has successfully assembled and tested conductors and networks made up of individual, newly developed building block molecules. These could in future serve as the basis of components for optoelectronic systems, such as flexible flat screens or sensors.

  • NRW Nano-Konferenz in Münster: Ministerin Schulze eröffnet international renommierte Veranstaltung

    Ministerin Svenja Schulze am Stand der Nanobay-NB GmbH

    Führende Rolle des Landes im Bereich der Nanotechnologie – 700 Gästen diskutieren über Chancen, Risiken und Potenziale. Münster steht für zwei Tage (7. und 8. Dezember 2016) ganz im Zeichen der Nanotechnologie: Die international renommierte NRW Nano-Konferenz findet erstmals in der Halle Münsterland statt. Mehr als 700 Gästen treffen sich zum Austausch über Chancen, Risiken und Potenziale der Nanotechnologie. Die Ausrichtung der Konferenz wird künftig im Wechsel zwischen den Standorten Münster und Dortmund stattfinden.
    NRW ist deutschlandweit der führende Standort für Nanotechnologie. Über 500 Akteure aus Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft befassen sich hier mit Nanomaterialien, Nanosicherheit, Nanoanalytik, Nanomedizin, Nanoelektronik, Nanoenergie und organischer Elektronik.

  • Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

    Extruded spiral made of polymer-coated silicon-nanosheets glowing in UV light. Photo: Tobias Helbich / TUM

    Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

  • Ten daily products with nanotechnology

    Nanotechnology defined as the science, engineering, and technology conducted at the nanoscale, which is about 1 to 100 nano meters has been around for something over 40 years now. Still when I talk about nanotechnology, general people perceive it as a technology of the future. At times I still get questions like “what is nanotechnology?” On this trying to explain on basis of the given definition mostly leaves a vague image of what nanotechnology really is. In my experience, I have always found it more effective to give examples of nanotechnology. This even more so when these are in their daily lives. That is where I would be dedicating this article towards. Here are the ten daily life products with nanotechnology.

  • The Coldest Chip in the World

    A chip with a Coulomb blockade thermometer on it is prepared for experiments at extremely low temperatures. (University of Basel, Department of Physics)

    Physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in cooling a nanoelectronic chip to a temperature lower than 3 millikelvin. The scientists from the Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute set this record in collaboration with colleagues from Germany and Finland. They used magnetic cooling to cool the electrical connections as well as the chip itself. The results were published in the journal Applied Physics Letters. Even scientists like to compete for records, which is why numerous working groups worldwide are using high-tech refrigerators to reach temperatures as close to absolute zero as possible. Absolute zero is 0 kelvin or -273.15°C. Physicists aim to cool their equipment to as close to absolute zero as possible, because these extremely low temperatures offer the ideal conditions for quantum experiments and allow entirely new physical phenomena to be examined.

  • The Hidden Nano Power Switch: Kiel Researchers Discover Switching Function in Molecular Wire

    Torben Jasper-Tönnies placed a single atom at the tip of the scanning tunnelling microscope and was able to join a tiny wire with a diameter of just one atom to an electrical circuit. Photo: Siekmann/CAU

    The increasing miniaturisation in electronics will result in components which consist of only a few molecules, or even just one molecule. An international research team from Kiel University (CAU) and the Donostia International Physics Center in San Sebastián/Spain, has developed a molecule integrating a wire with a diameter of only a single atom. They discovered that the current can be regulated via this molecular wire. It works like a nano power switch, and makes the use of molecular wires in electronic components at the nano scale feasible. The research team’s findings appeared in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.