Construction

  • Cooperation with Namibia underway for new materials for industrial applications

    f.l.: Gerhard Wenz, Saar Uni, Bernd Reinhard, INM, Günter Weber, INM, Erold Naomab, UNAM, Kenneth Matengu, UNAM, Aránzazu del Campo, , INM, Roland Rolles, Saar Uni, Carsten Becker-Willinger, INM. Sourec: INM

    The INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials officially began its collaborative effort with the University of Namibia (UNAM) by holding a kick-off workshop. The aim of the joint project, NaMiComp, which is funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, is to analyze Namibia’s locally available natural resources and then use them as a basis for new materials for industrial applications. INM and UNAM are working together on the NaMiComp project in order to establish and strengthen research competence in materials science at UNAM. In the long term, the aim is to build an on-site materials science institute at the University of Namibia.

  • EU project INNOVIP: new technologies for long-lasting and cost-effective vacuum insulation panels

    Vacuum Insulation Panels. FIW München

    High-tech building insulation: EU research project INNOVIP to develop new technologies for long-lasting and cost-effective vacuum insulation panels. Munich – The demands from Brussels are ambitious: by 2050, office and private buildings in Europe must lower their CO2 footprint by around 80 percent, compared to 1990 levels (1). Optimal thermal insulation will play a key role in achieving this target. Vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) are particularly promising in this regard, but are still very expensive and difficult to work with. Moreover, to ensure a high level of market acceptance, the lifetime of the panels has to be improved.

  • Evaluating Risk of Hydrogen Embrittlement: New Simulation of Cold Cracks in High-strength Steels

    Light microscopy image of a welded connection’s weld structure. © Fraunhofer IWM

    High-strength steels play a vital role in the construction of modern vehicles and machines. If these steels are welded during the production of components, mobile hydrogen atoms can cause problems within the material: the atoms accumulate slowly at highly stressed areas of a component, resulting in the steel becoming brittle at these locations. This can result in so-called cold break formations which can lead to component failure. Dr. Frank Schweizer of the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM has developed a simulation method with which component manufacturers can assess cold break tendencies and adjust their production accordingly.

  • Fireproofing Made of recycled paper

    A blow-in insulation becomes solid. Empa

    Scientists at Empa teamed up with isofloc AG to develop an insulating material made of recycled paper. It is ideal for prefabricated wooden elements and even multistory timber houses, and protects the construction against fire. What's more: The additive it contains is harmless to humans, animals and the environment. Franziska Grüneberger looks contented; clutching a nondescript cube made of grey flakes in her hand the researcher in the laborato-ry for applied wood materials has achieved her goal: Very little chemistry went into the cube, but no shortage of technical expertise. The tiny object is “living” proof that giant mountains of waste paper can be transformed into a valuable, fireproof insulating material – a big step to save fossil fuels. Not that anyone could tell just by looking at it.

  • Hannover Messe: Improved corrosion protection with flake-type zinc-phosphate particles

    Because of the disordered arrangement of the flakes, they can not run through the sandglass like spheric particles do. Source: Ollmann

    To prevent corrosive substances from penetrating into materials, a common method is to create an anti-corrosion coating by applying paint layers of zinc-phosphate particles. Now, research scientists at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials developed a special type of zinc-phosphate particles: They are flake-like in shape because they are ten times as long as they are thick. Large quantities of steel are used in architecture, bridge construction and ship-building. Structures of this type are intended to be long-lasting. Furthermore, even in the course of many years, they should not lose any of their qualities regarding strength and safety. For this reason, the steel plates and girders used must have extensive and durable protection against corrosion.

  • ILA 2018: Automated Lightweight Construction Reduces Weight and Costs

    The Fraunhofer ENAS manufactures printed circuit boards in screen printing on a flexible plastic film. The tracks transmit electrical impulses – for example, to make LEDs glow. Fraunhofer ENAS

    The aircraft of the future flies electrically and autonomously, is feather-light and can be conveniently produced in a fully automated manner. While the electrification and permanent autopilot are still in their infancy, lightweight construction is already indispensable today. Digital manufacturing processes are about to be applied. Fraunhofer will present new automated production technologies for lightweight construction materials at the ILA, the largest innovation trade fair in the aerospace industry, at the Berlin ExpoCenter Airport from April 25 to 29, 2018 (Hall 2, Booth 229).

  • Wireless sensor systems prevent soap etc. topped up

    Checking dispensers with a tablet computer in a networked washroom. CWS-boco International GmbH

    Washrooms are among the highest-maintenance rooms in companies. A new Fraunhofer technology now monitors soap, cotton towel and toilet paper dispensers fully automatically, and notifies the cleaning staff when levels are running low. At the core of the “CWS Washroom Information Service” are sensors and some ingenious wireless technology. “The cotton towels are running out in washroom 17 on the third floor, in washroom 21 on the fourth floor the soap is almost empty, and in 26 there is almost no toilet paper left.”Armed with this kind of information in advance, cleaning staff will be able to plan their rounds far more effectively in the future. No small thing, given that washrooms are among the highest-maintenance rooms in buildings. As well as having to be cleaned, their soap, hand-towels and toilet paper have to be replenished regularly. The Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS has now designed a highly efficient solution to this problem.