Analysis

  • 36 big data research projects

    Big Data

    The SNSF is launching the National Research Programme “Big Data”, which aims to develop novel methods of information analysis, to create specific applications and to suggest solutions to the ethical and legal challenges posed by big data. Several billion gigabytes of data are created each day. This mass of information offers new opportunities, but also raises many questions for society. Launched by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF), the National Research Programme “Big Data” (NRP 75) aims to develop Switzerland’s competences in the field of big data and will focus equally on scientific and technical aspects and governance issues. Research work on the 36 projects comprised within NRP 75 will continue until 2021.

  • Fine-Tuning for Additive Production

    “COAXshield” – novel local shielding nozzle system for laser metal deposition applications with sensitive materials. © Fraunhofer IWS Dresden

    "COAXshield" and "LIsec": Fraunhofer IWS presents shielding gas nozzle and light scanner for laser powder build-up welding at "formnext" trade fair. Additive manufacturing systems can generate highly complex components, which could not be produced with conventional machine tools or only with great effort. Nevertheless, such industrial 3D printers are far from being standard equipment in factories. This is not just due to the purchase costs, but also to many other challenges.

  • For Bacteria, the Neighbors Co-determine Which Cell Dies First: The Physiology of Survival

    Co-author Elena Biselli at the microscope. Image: A. Heddergott / TUM

    Bacteria do not simply perish in hunger phases fortuitously; rather, the surrounding cells have a say as well. A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered that two factors, above all, decide over life and death: the energy required to continue living and the efficiency with which surviving cells can recycle biomass from dead cells.

  • Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

    Mapping electromagnetic waveforms | A three-dimensional depiction of the spatial variation of the optical electromagnetic field around a microantenna following excitation with terahertz pulse. The optical field is mapped with the aid of electron pulses. Graphic: Dr. Peter Baum

    Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second. With this new microscope researchers will be able to obtain fundamental insights of how transistors or optoelectronic switches operate at the microscopic level.

  • Setting New Standards in Solids Analysis

    The team grinds up samples of rocks and other materials to nano-sized particles, such as iron ore (photo). They can be used as reference materials for precise calibration of measuring devices. Simon Nordstad / Kiel University

    Young start-up team from Kiel University develops new reference materials for direct microanalysis of solids. How badly plants are affected by contaminated soil, what the sea floor can reveal about past climate periods, or what yield an ore mine could deliver in future - an analysis of the chemical composition of minerals and rocks can often provide valuable information. For accurate results, not only are high-quality measuring devices required, but also first-class reference materials, in order to be able to accurately calibrate the instruments.