The mechanical properties of the green lacewing egg stalks are so remarkable that researchers would like to replicate them in technical fibers.  Wikimedia Commons, Karthik R. Bhat

Innovative biofibers made from a silk protein of the green lacewing are being developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP in conjunction with the company AMSilk GmbH. Researchers are working on producing the protein in large quantities by using biotechnology. The aim is to use the material in the future as a high-grade rigid fiber, for example, in lightweight plastics in transportation technology. It can also be conceivably used in medical technology, for example, as a biocompatible silk coating on implants. The Fraunhofer IAP is presenting its initial material sample at the International Green Week Berlin from January 20 to 29, 2017 in Hall 4.2, booth 212.

Gear oils formulated to NUFLUX™ technology standards with VISCOBASE® 11-522 have a particularly long service life between fewer drain intervals. (Source: Evonik Industries)

- Evonik’s synthetic base oil VISCOBASE® 11-522 improves wind farm efficiency
- Approved by leading gearbox manufacturers
- Application in mining and steel industries also

Operators of wind energy farms place steep demands on the gear oil for their wind turbines: long oil drain intervals, sustained optimal viscosity of the oil over a wide temperature range, and maximum durability and long life for the gearbox.

BASE Penning trap system that was used to measure the magnetic moment of the antiproton photo/©: Georg Schneider, JGU

Physicists publish most accurate measurement of a fundamental property of the antiproton to date / Contribution to the matter-antimatter debate

As self-evident as it is that matter exists, its origins are just as mysterious. According to the principles of particle physics, when the universe was originally formed equal amounts of matter and antimatter would have been created, which then should have destroyed each other in a process that physicists call annihilation. But in reality, our universe shows a manifest imbalance in favor of matter.

The Team of physicists in their laser laboratory (from left to right): Philipp Sulzer, Dr. Andrey Moskalenko, Dr. Denis Seletskiy, Maximilian Seeger, Dr. Claudius Riek, Prof. Alfred Leitenstorfer und Prof. Guido Burkard. Uni Konstanz

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum. An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by Professor Alfred Leitenstorfer has now shown how to manipulate the electric vacuum field and thus generate deviations from the ground state of empty space which can only be understood in the context of the quantum theory of light.