FLTR: Coating by liquid flame spray; surface SEM ; letters on paper below liquid repellent coating; confocal microscopy image of water drop resting on coating on glass. Copyright Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. Reproduced with permission.

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, and the Tampere University of Technology, Finland, have found a new way of applying a structured coating for liquid repellency.
By using liquid flame spray, the method is extremely fast. Not only water but also oil drops do not adhere to these surfaces but remain spherical and bounce or roll off easily.

Depending on the magnetic configuration of the spin valve, the electrical signal is transmitted (bottom) or suppressed (top). ill./©: Joel Cramer

Magnon spintronics employs magnons instead of electrical charges for information processing. In the emerging field of magnon spintronics, researchers investigate the possibility to transport and process information by means of so-called magnon spin currents. In contrast to electrical currents, on which todays information technology is based, magnon spin currents do not conduct electrical charges but magnetic momenta.

The printed stripes make all the difference. By series connection, each square of ten stripes is capable of producing a voltage of about 8 Volt. © Fraunhofer IAP

Imagine a jacket that produces enough electricity to charge your mobile phone. Imagine a jacket that does not only reflect, but light up itself when you ride your bike in the dark. Innovative printing solutions make future happen today. The Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP presents different prototypes from photovoltaics research projects at the international exhibition and conference for the printed electronics industry LOPEC 2018 in Munich, March 13 to 15. First projects resulting from the German OLED Technology Alliance (GOTA) are being presented as well.

Fraunhofer IAP at LOPEC: Hall B0 Booth 207

The test cell has been successfully implemented in research projects at Fraunhofer ISE and duplicated for project partners. Fraunhofer ISE

The Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE is presenting innovative solutions and projects on renewable energy storage and grid integration at the Energy Storage Europe, the leading international trade fair for storage in Düsseldorf, Germany from March 13-15. Fraunhofer ISE is presenting at a joint booth of the Fraunhofer Energy Alliance (Hall 8b, booth B39). Parallel to the trade fair, the 12th International Renewable Energy Storage Conference (IRES) and the 7th Energy Storage Europe Conference (ESE) are taking place.

Demonstration: A video at the ILA Berlin Air Show shows how quickly, precisely and efficiently EHLA Laser Material Deposition works. © Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany / Volker Lannert.

At the 2018 ILA Berlin Air Show from April 25–29, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is showcasing extreme high-speed Laser Material Deposition (EHLA): A video documents how for metal components that are highly loaded, EHLA has already proved itself as an alternative to hard chrome plating, which is now allowed only under special conditions.

The team grinds up samples of rocks and other materials to nano-sized particles, such as iron ore (photo). They can be used as reference materials for precise calibration of measuring devices. Simon Nordstad / Kiel University

Young start-up team from Kiel University develops new reference materials for direct microanalysis of solids. How badly plants are affected by contaminated soil, what the sea floor can reveal about past climate periods, or what yield an ore mine could deliver in future - an analysis of the chemical composition of minerals and rocks can often provide valuable information. For accurate results, not only are high-quality measuring devices required, but also first-class reference materials, in order to be able to accurately calibrate the instruments.

NRW nanoconference 2018

The NRW Nano Conference is Germany’s largest conference with international appeal in the field of nanotechnologies. It takes place every two years at changing locations. More than 700 experts from science, industry and politics meet for two days to promote research and application of the key technology at the network meeting.

Geometry of a molecular cluster of dopant and host molecules with benzimidazoline dopant and a C60 molecule. S. Schellhammer/ F. Ortmann

A group of physicists from the cfaed at TU Dresden, together with researchers from Japan, were able to demonstrate in a study how the doping of organic semiconductors can be simulated and experimentally verified. The study has now been published in “Nature Materials”. In semiconductor technology, doping refers to the intentional introduction of impurities (also known as dopants) into a layer or into the intrinsic semiconductor of an integrated circuit.

Visualization of a current through an OLED, flowing via a thin molecular layer (center) from an electrode (left) to an organic semiconductor (right). Copyright: Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, have received an unexpected result: They have discovered a new method to improve contacts in OLEDs. This new approach leads to a higher energy efficiency and can be used in almost any organic semiconductor element.

A large-scale integrated silicon-photonic quantum circuit for controlling multidimensional entanglement. Graphic: from the original publication

The realisation of controllable large quantum devices is key for the development of quantum technologies. Now a team of researchers from the University of Bristol, Peking University, Technical University of Denmark, ICFO Spain, PAS, University of Copenhagen and Dr. Jordi Tura from the Theory Division at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics has developed a large-scale integrated silicon-photonics quantum circuit for the precise and general control of multidimensional entanglement.

The Fraunhofer IAF is coordinating the joint project »DiaPol«. As part of the project, researchers combine the classical MRI method with a nanodiamond polarisator. romaset – Fotolia.com

With nanodiamond the tumor tissue can be detected sooner and distinguished better from the healthy surrounding tissue. Aiming at an improvement of the MRI procedure in the joint project »DiaPol« Fraunhofer IAF cooperates with the University of Ulm, the company NVision Imaging Technologies GmbH, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Israeli Center for Advanced Diamond Technologies (ICDAT). The novel technology offers great opportunities: the extremely precise and quickly available results make it possible to adjust the treatment of the tumor tissue to the patient in a significantly more efficient way than it has ever been possible with previous methods.

Smooth muscle cells regulate contraction of arteries and veins, the respiratory as well as the intestinal system. HZI/Tobias May

Researchers from Braunschweig developed a universal method that allows them to proliferate cells of any donor tissue while maintaining their function. When scientists discover a new active substance, e.g. for use against a pathogen, they usually study its exact effect in cultured cells. But there is a lack of suitable test systems that simulate body tissues, because cells rapidly lose their specific properties once they are away from their natural environment.

Moss plants on a Petri dish. Photo: Sigrid Gombert (University of Freiburg)

Scientists find proteins important for plant development, DNA repair and gene targeting. All living cells have invented mechanisms to protect their DNA against breaks during duplication and against damage by UV-light or chemicals. A team of biologists led by Prof. Dr. Ralf Reski from the Faculty of Biology of the University of Freiburg, Germany has now found that members of the RecQ family function in development, DNA repair and gene targeting in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

3-D model of liquid water (oxygen red, hydrogen white): Intra- and intermolecular vibrations of hydrogen bonds (green) let the whole network "dance". © Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research have developed the novel 2D TIRV spectroscopy technique to observe coupling between intramolecular and intermolecular vibrations that make water molecules “dance”. Liquid water is permeated by a highly dynamic network of strong hydrogen bonds. Motions of molecules in this network underlie fundamental physical and chemical phenomena.

The OptisCell process is designed for fully automated operation and works without any markers or contact. © Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany.

At this year’s analytica trade fair in Munich, three Fraunhofer Institutes will be presenting a project from pre-competitive research. Biologists, computer scientists and laser experts have developed a process to analyze and select cells and then examine their protein production. In pharmaceutical research, this will make it possible to develop active ingredients much faster than before.

Artistic representation of a plasmonic nano-resonator realized by a narrow slit in a gold layer. Upon approaching the quantum dot (red) to the slit opening the coupling strength increases. Image: Heiko Groß

Publishing in a journal like Science Advances usually heralds a particularly exciting innovation. Now, physicists from the Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg (JMU) in Germany and Imperial College London in the UK are reporting controlled coupling of light and matter at room temperature. This achievement is particularly significant as it builds the foundations for a realization of practical photonic quantum technologies.