EUV

Extreme ultraviolet radiation (EUV or XUV) or high-energy ultraviolet radiation is electromagnetic radiation in the part of the electromagnetic spectrum spanning wavelengths from 124 nm down to 10 nm, and therefore (by the Planck–Einstein equation) having photons with energies from 10 eV up to 124 eV (corresponding to 124 nm to 10 nm respectively). EUV is naturally generated by the solar corona and artificially by plasma and synchrotron light sources.

Its main uses are photoelectron spectroscopy, solar imaging, and lithography.

In air, EUV is the most highly absorbed component of the electromagnetic spectrum, requiring high vacuum for transmission.

  • Atomic precision: technologies for the next-but-one generation of microchips

    Atomic precision technologies for the next but one generation of microchips picture 2 Image 2: The coating of mirrors is carried out with atomic precision at Fraunhofer IOF in Jena. © Fraunhofer IOF, Jena, Germany

    In the Beyond EUV project, the Fraunhofer Institutes for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen and for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering IOF in Jena are developing key technologies for the manufacture of a new generation of microchips using EUV radiation at a wavelength of 6.7 nm. The resulting structures are barely thicker than single atoms, and they make it possible to produce extremely integrated circuits for such items as wearables or mind-controlled prosthetic limbs.