Nano gold

Also known as colloidal gold, gold nanoparticles are a sol or colloidal suspension of submicrometre-size nanoparticles of gold in a fluid, usually water. The liquid is usually either an intense red colour (for particles less than 100 nm) or blue/purple (for larger particles). Due to the unique optical, electronic, and molecular-recognition properties of gold nanoparticles, they are the subject of substantial research, with applications in a wide variety of areas, including electron microscopy, electronics, nanotechnology,and materials science.

The properties of colloidal gold nanoparticles, and thus their applications, depend strongly upon their size and shape. For example, rodlike particles have both transverse and longitudinal absorption peak, and anisotropy of the shape affects their self-assembly.

  • Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

    Arists’ view of the quantized thermal conductance of an atomically thin gold contact. Created by Enrique Sahagun

    In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport. The precise control of electron transport in microelectronics makes complex logic circuits possible that are in daily use in smartphones and laptops. Heat transport is of similar fundamental importance and its control is for instance necessary to efficiently cool the ever smaller chips. An international team including theoretical physicists from Konstanz, Junior Professor Fabian Pauly and Professor Peter Nielaba and their staff, has achieved a real breakthrough in better understanding heat transport at the nanoscale.