Antibodies

  • Bakterien aus dem Blut «ziehen»

    Bakterien können mit magnetischer Blutreinigung entfernt werden (links). Eine Lösung mit magnetischen Eisenpartikeln (oben rechts), kann mitt einem Magneten "gereinigt" werden (unten rechts). Empa

    Magnete statt Antibiotika, das könnte eine mögliche neue Behandlungsmethode bei Blutvergiftungen sein. Dazu wird das Blut der Patienten mit magnetischen Eisenpartikeln versetzt, die die Bakterien an sich binden, ehe sie durch Magnete aus dem Blut entfernt werden. Erste Laborversuche sind an der Empa in St. Gallen gelungen – und erfolgversprechend. Blutvergiftungen enden auch heutzutage noch in über 50% der Fälle tödlich, lassen sich aber im Anfangsstadium durchaus kurieren. Daher ist oberstes Gebot, schnell zu handeln. Aus diesem Grund verabreichen Ärzte meist schon bei einem Verdacht auf Blutvergiftung Antibiotika, ohne vorher abzuklären, ob es sich tatsächlich um eine bakterielle Sepsis handelt, was wiederum die Gefahr für Resistenzen massiv erhöht. Es gilt also, eine schnelle und effektive Therapie zu finden, möglichst ohne auf Antibiotika zurückgreifen zu müssen.

  • COPD – what causes the lungs to lose their ability to heal?

    The molecule Wnt5a prevents the repair of structures in the lung of COPD patients. Shown here are the alveolar epithelium (green) and immune cells (red). Source: Helmholtz Zentrum München

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the patients’ lungs lose their ability to repair damages on their own. Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, partner in the German Center for Lung Research (DZL) now have a new idea as to why this might be so. In the ‘Journal of Experimental Medicine’, they blame the molecule Wnt5a for this problem. The first indication of COPD is usually a chronic cough. As the disease progresses, the airways narrow and often pulmonary emphysema develops. This indicates irreversible expansion and damage to the alveoli, or air sacks. "The body is no longer able to repair the destroyed structures," explains Dr. Dr. Melanie Königshoff, head of the Research Unit Lung Repair and Regeneration (LRR) at the Comprehensive Pneumology Center (CPC) of Helmholtz Zentrum München. She and her team have made it their job to understand how this happens.

  • Is an agent used to treat psoriasis aimed at the wrong target?

    Common psoriasis, also called psoriasis vulgaris, is an inflammatory skin disease. Source Helmholtz Zentrum München

    The antibody ustekinumab is in use for treatment of psoriasis since 2009. It inhibits the underlying inflammation by neutralizing certain messengers of the immune system. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, the Technical University of Munich and the University of Zurich have now shown in ‘Nature Communications’ that one of these messengers could actually be helpful in battling the illness. Common psoriasis, also called psoriasis vulgaris, is an inflammatory skin disease that is characterized by severely scaling skin in areas ranging from small to palm-sized. The disease is estimated to affect between two and three percent of all Europeans.

  • Peptides as tags in fluorescence microscopy

    Synapses of brain cells made visible using fluorescence tagging based on antibodies: pre-synapses (red) and post-synapses (green) appear out of focus; the synaptic cleft is not fully resolved. (Picture: Franziska Neubert & Sören Doose)

    Advance in biomedical imaging: The Biocenter of the University of Würzburg in close collaboration with the University of Copenhagen has developed an alternative approach to fluorescent tagging of proteins. The new probes are practicable and compatible with high-resolution microscopic procedures. Fluorescence microscopy visualizes the molecular elements of cells. Proteins of nerve cells, for instance, can be labelled using probes which are subsequently excited with light to fluoresce. In the end, the fluorescence signal is used to generate microscopic images of the real position, arrangement and number of proteins.

  • Successfully Treating Genetically Determined Autoimmune Enteritis

    Poor to moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the stomach. H&E stain.

    Using targeted immunotherapy, doctors have succeeded in curing a type of autoimmune enteritis caused by a recently discovered genetic mutation. This report comes from researchers at the Department of Biomedicine of the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel. Their results raise new possibilities for the management of diarrhea, which is often a side effect of melanoma treatment. Immunodeficiencies can arise due to gene mutations in immune system proteins. As such mutations rarely occur, these immunodeficiencies often go unrecognized or are detected too late for effective treatment. Currently, there are more than 300 different known genetically determined immunodeficiencies, with new examples being described almost every week.