Cell biology

  • ALGEN REVOLUTIONIEREN 3D-DRUCK VON ZELLEN

    Felix Krujatz erhält für seine Doktorarbeit auf dem Gebiet der Algenbiotechnologie den Nachwuchsförderpreis der Sächsischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. Kirsten Mann

    Wissenschaftler der TU Dresden gewinnt Nachwuchsförderpreis der Sächsischen Akademie der Wissenschaften / Algenbiotechnologie revolutioniert 3D-Bioprinting / weltweit erster 3D-gedruckter Bioreaktor mit OLEDS macht neue Untersuchungsmethoden möglich. Felix Krujatz, Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter an der Fakultät Maschinenwesen der TU Dresden, erhält für seine Doktorarbeit „Entwicklung und Evaluierung neuer Bioreaktorkonzepte für phototrophe Mikroorganismen“ den Nachwuchsförderpreis der Sächsischen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Leipzig. Seine Forschungsergebnisse enthalten mehrere Weltneuheiten auf dem Gebiet der Biotechnologie und können u.a. das Bioprinting menschlicher Zellen für regenerative Therapien revolutionieren sowie eine neue Generation von Bioreaktoren hervorbringen. Der Preis wird am 09. Dezember um 16:00 Uhr in Leipzig öffentlich verliehen.

  • Bacterial Pac Man molecule snaps at sugar

    The P domain (yellow) patrols with its mouth open until it encounters a sialic acid molecule (purple). This movement was analyzed with distance measurements using the spin markers shown in blue.  © Dr. Gregor Hagelüken/Uni Bonn

    Many pathogens use certain sugar compounds from their host to help conceal themselves against the immune system. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now, in cooperation with researchers at the University of York in the United Kingdom, analyzed the dynamics of a bacterial molecule that is involved in this process. They demonstrate that the protein grabs onto the sugar molecule with a Pac Man-like chewing motion and holds it until it can be used. Their results could help design therapeutics that could make the protein poorer at grabbing and holding and hence compromise the pathogen in the host. The study has now been published in “Biophysical Journal”.

  • Blood pressure medication paves the way for approaches to managing Barrett's syndrome

    Svein Olav Bratlie

    New ways of using mechanisms behind certain blood pressure medications may in the future spare some patient groups both discomfort and lifelong concern over cancer of the esophagus. This, in any case, is the goal of several studies of patients with Barrett's syndrome at Sahlgrenska Academy. “If we could filter out those who are not at greater risk, it would represent huge gains for both patients and health care providers,” says Svein Olav Bratlie, a researcher in gastro surgery and clinician at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. It is estimated that between one and two percent of the Swedish population has Barrett's syndrome, a condition in which the membrane in the lower part of the esophagus becomes more like that of the intestine and more acid-resistant. Barrett's syndrome is preceded by the common reflux affliction that involves long-term leakage of stomach acid up into the esophagus.

  • Cancer Research - How Cells Die by Ferroptosis

    A Fibroblast Undergoing Ferroptosis. Source: Helmholtz Zentrum München

    Ferroptosis is a recently discovered form of cell death, which is still only partially understood. Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have now identified an enzyme that plays a key role in generating the signal that initiates cell death. Their findings, published in two articles in the journal ‘Nature Chemical Biology’, could now give new impetus to research into the fields of cancer, neurodegeneration and other degenerative diseases. The term ferroptosis was first coined in 2012. It is derived from the Greek word ptosis, meaning “a fall”, and ferrum, the Latin word for iron, and describes a form of regulated necrotic cell death in which iron appears to play an important role.

  • Chemists Create Clusters of Organelles by Mimicking Nature

    Two polymersomes assemble by DNA hybridization: the single DNA strands on the surface of the compartments interconnect, creating an extremely stable DNA bridge. University of Basel

    Scientists from the University of Basel have succeeded in organizing spherical compartments into clusters mimicking the way natural organelles would create complex structures. They managed to connect the synthetic compartments by creating bridges made of DNA between them. This represents an important step towards the realization of so-called molecular factories. The journal Nano Letters has published their results.

  • Cholesterol important for signal transmission in cells

    CXCR4 receptor which belongs to a group known as G protein-coupled receptors. FAU/Rainer Böckmann

    Cholesterol can bind important molecules into pairs, enabling human cells to react to external signals. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg’s (FAU) Chair of Biotechnology have studied these processes in more detail using computer simulations. Their findings have now been published in the latest volume of the journal PLOS Computational Biology*. FAU researchers Kristyna Pluhackova and Stefan Gahbauer discovered that cholesterol strongly influences signal transmission in the body. Their study focused on the chemokine receptor CXCR4, which belong to a group known as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors sense external stimuli such as light, hormones or sugar and pass these signals on to the interior of the cell which reacts to them. CXCR4 normally supports the human immune system. However, it also plays an important role in the formation of metastases and the penetration of HIV into the cell interior.

  • Dissecting bacterial infections at the single-cell level

    Left: a macrophage (nucleus in blue) infected with a non-replicating bacteria in yellow indicated by an arrow and on the right infected with bacteria that has replicated (red). (Picture: Antoine-Emmanuel Saliba)

    Technological advances are making the analysis of single bacterial infected human cells feasible, Würzburg researchers have used this technology to provide new insight into the Salmonella infection process. The study has just been published in “Nature Microbiology”. Infectious diseases are a leading cause of mortality worldwide. The development of novel therapies or vaccines requires improved understanding of how viruses, pathogenic fungi or bacteria cause illnesses.

  • Ectoine reduces chronic lung inflammation: A new therapeutic approach against COPD

    Illustration depicting bronchoconstriction

    Researchers at the IUF – Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of the natural compound ectoine against chronic lung inflammation in an inhalation study with female volunteers from the industrial Ruhr region. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to world health organization (WHO), is currently the third leading cause of death.

  • Enough is enough - stem cell factor Nanog knows when to slow down

    STILT generates simulated protein expression of dividing cells based on measured data and a dynamic model. Source: Helmholtz Zentrum München

    The transcription factor Nanog plays a crucial role in the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. Previously unclear was how its protein abundance is regulated in the cells. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich, working in collaboration with colleagues from ETH Zürich, now report in ‘Cell Systems’ that the more Nanog there is on hand, the less reproduction there is. Every stem cell researcher knows the protein Nanog* because it ensures that these all-rounders continue to renew. A controversial debate revolved around how the quantity of Nanog protein in the cell is regulated.

  • Europe wide cooperation on spinal cord injury research receives 1.34 Million Euros grant

    Dr. Michell M. Reimer © CRTD

    Support for translational research: Europe wide cooperation on spinal cord injury research receives 1.34 Million Euros grant.
    Six European research teams including Dr. Michell Reimer and his team at the DFG-Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) - Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden, received a 1.34 Million Euros ERA NET NEURON Grant for their research on spinal cord injury funded by the European Commission. The funding will start in 2017. Dresden. Spinal cord injury results from trauma to the vertebral column, usually caused by accidents during sport activities or driving. Injury of the spinal cord is a devastating condition for the individuals who suffer not only from paralysis but also chronic pain and impairment of bodily functions such as bowel and bladder control.

  • Forscher sehen Biomolekülen bei der Arbeit zu

    Ein Cytochrom-Molekül  wurde mit einem magnetischen Etikett versehen (farbige Struktur rechts oben). Zusammen mit einem Bestandteil des Cytochroms (rot) konnte dann der Abstand bestimmt werden. © AG Schiemann/Uni Bonn

    Wissenschaftlern der Universität Bonn ist es gelungen, einem wichtigen Zellprotein bei der Arbeit zuzusehen. Sie nutzten dazu eine Methode, mit der man Strukturänderungen komplexer Moleküle messen kann. Das weiter entwickelte Verfahren erlaubt es, derartige Prozesse in der Zelle zu beobachten, also der natürlichen Umgebung. Die Forscher stellen zudem eine Art Werkzeugkasten zur Verfügung, der die Vermessung unterschiedlichster Moleküle erlaubt. Ihre Studie ist jetzt in der Zeitschrift „Angewandte Chemie International Edition“ erschienen. Wenn wir eine vorweihnachtliche Walnuss öffnen wollen, benutzen wir dazu in der Regel einen Nussknacker. Der besteht im einfachsten Fall aus zwei Schenkeln, die sich um ein Gelenk gegeneinander bewegen und so Druck auf die Schale ausüben können. Ganz simpel, eigentlich – um zu begreifen, wie so ein Nussknacker funktioniert, genügt es uns, ihn ein einziges Mal in Aktion zu sehen.

  • Genregulation: In Form für den richtigen Schnitt

    Bindung der großen Untereinheit von U2AF an die Vorläufer-Boten-mRNA Bild: Christoph Hohmann / NIM

    Bevor genetische Information in Proteine umgesetzt wird, entfernt eine komplexe molekulare Maschine – das Spleißosom – nicht benötigte Sequenzen. Dabei spielt dessen Struktur eine wichtige Rolle, wie LMU-Wissenschaftler zeigen. Ribonukleinsäure – kurz RNA – übermittelt die in den Genen gespeicherten Erbinformationen und damit die Bauanleitung für Proteine. Bei der Genabschrift im Zellkern entsteht zuerst eine Vorläufer-Boten RNA (mRNA), aus der durch eine komplexe molekulare Maschine im Zellkern – das Spleißosom –unterschiedliche nicht benötigte Abschnitte herausgeschnitten und entfernt werden. Dieser Vorgang wird als alternatives Spleißen bezeichnet und spielt für die Genregulation eine wichtige Rolle, denn jeder der zurechtgeschnittenen mRNA-Stränge liefert den Bauplan für ein anderes Protein – ein Gen kann also in mehrere Proteine mit unterschiedlicher Funktion umgesetzt werden.

  • Greifswalder Forscher dringen mit superauflösendem Mikroskop in zellulären Mikrokosmos ein

    Die Professoren Nicole und Karlhans Endlich am neuen Superresolution-Mikroskop. Foto: Kilian Dorner

    Das Institut für Anatomie und Zellbiologie weiht am Montag, 05.12.2016, mit einem wissenschaftlichen Symposium das erste Superresolution-Mikroskop in Greifswald ein. Das Forschungsmikroskop wurde von der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) und dem Land Mecklenburg-Vorpommern finanziert. Nun können die Greifswalder Wissenschaftler Strukturen bis zu einer Größe von einigen Millionstel Millimetern mittels Laserlicht sichtbar machen.

  • Guards of the human immune system unraveled

    Dendritic cells in lymphatic tissues are mainly influenced by their genetic identity, while in lungs and skin dendritic cells are predominantly affected by tissue-specific factors. © Carla Schaffer / AAAS

    Dendritic cells represent an important component of the immune system: they recognize and engulf invaders, which subsequently triggers a pathogen-specific immune response. Scientists of the University Hospital Erlangen of the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and the LIMES (Life and Medical Sciences) Institute of the University of Bonn gained substantial knowledge of human dendritic cells, which might contribute to the development of immune therapies in the future. The results were recently published in the Journal “Science Immunology”.

  • How cells take out the trash: the “phospho-kiss of death” deciphered

    Phosphoarginine functions as a protein degradation tag in Gram-positive bacteria IMP

    Cells never forget to take out the trash. It has long been known that cells tag proteins for degradation by labelling them with ubiquitin, a signal described as “the molecular kiss of death”. In the current issue of Nature, Tim Clausen’s group at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna identifies an analogous system in gram-positive bacteria, where the role of a degradation tag is fulfilled by a little known post-translational modification: arginine phosphorylation. The discovery opens new avenues for designing antibacterial therapies.

  • How Does Friendly Fire Happen in the Pancreas?

    Treatment with an antagomir directed against miR92a results in reduced attacks of immune cells (green) on the insulin (white) producing beta cells directly in the pancreas. Moreover, the treatment leads to more regulatory T cells (red) able to protect the beta cells. Source: Helmholtz Zentrum München

    In type 1 diabetes, the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München, partner in the German Center for Diabetes Research, and their colleagues at Technical University of Munich have now reported in the journal ‘PNAS’ about a mechanism used by the immune system to prepare for this attack. They were able to inhibit this process through targeted intervention and are now hoping this will lead to new possibilities for treatment.

  • Molekulare Kamera macht Substanzen in Zellen sichtbar

    Rädertierchen frisst Pantoffeltierchen: Die Abbildungen a, c, e und g zeigen jeweils drei verschiedene Substanzen (in rot, grün bzw. blau), die in den vier Pantoffeltierchen vorgefunden wurden. Abbildung: Kompauer et al., Nature Methods

    Neues Massenspektrometer an der Universität Gießen ermöglicht vielfältige Forschungen in den Lebenswissenschaften – Veröffentlichung in „Nature Methods“. Eine weltweit einzigartige an der Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen (JLU) entwickelte Untersuchungsmethode vereint die Vorteile von Mikroskop und Massenspektrometer: Mit dem neuen Gerät, das die Arbeitsgruppe des Chemikers Prof. Dr. Bernhard Spengler in der aktuellen Ausgabe von „Nature Methods“ vorstellt, lassen sich unzählige Stoffe dank Massenspektrometrie in biologischem Gewebe nachweisen und in ihrem chemischen Aufbau entschlüsseln.

  • Multiple Sklerose: Neu entdeckter Signalmechanismus macht T-Zellen pathogen

    Die dendritische Zelle und die T-Zelle bei der Clusterbildung (rechts im Bild); Prof. Dr. Thomas Korn (Technische Universität München)

    Folgenschwere Instruktionen: T-Zellen sind ein wichtiger Teil des Immunsystems. Sie können aber nicht nur Krankheitserreger ausschalten, sondern auch selbst zu einer Gefahr werden. Forscherinnen und Forscher der Technischen Universität München (TUM) und der Universitätsmedizin Mainz haben herausgefunden, wann bestimmte T-Zellen zu krankheitserregenden T-Zellen werden, die mit Multipler Sklerose in Verbindung gebracht werden. Die Ergebnisse erklären, warum bestimmte Behandlungsansätze nicht zuverlässig wirken. Sie sind in der aktuellen Ausgabe von „nature immunology“ veröffentlicht.

  • Neue Wirkstoffanwendung als mögliche personalisierte Therapie bei häufigem Lungenkrebs

    Studienleiter Sebastian Nijman (rechts) und Ferran Fece de la Cruz, Co-Erstautor (links). James Hall/Oxford University

    Eine Untergruppe von Lungentumoren, die bisher als unbehandelbar galt, reagiert extrem empfindlich auf eine kürzlich zugelassene Gruppe von Krebsmedikamenten – das haben Forscher des CeMM Forschungszentrum für Molekulare Medizin der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Universität Oxford herausgefunden. Ihre Studie in Nature Communications eröffnet neue Wege, um eine Therapie für bis zu 10% aller Lungenkrebspatienten zu finden.

  • New chemistry of life

    Lung tissue during legionellosis.

    FRANKFURT. The attachment of ubiquitin was long considered as giving the „kiss of death“, labelling superfluous proteins for disposal within a cell. However, by now it has been well established that ubiquitin fulfils numerous additional duties in cellular signal transduction. A team of scientists under the lead of Ivan Dikic, Director of the Institute of Biochemistry II at Goethe University Frankfurt, has now discovered a novel mechanism of ubiquitination, by which Legionella bacteria can seize control over their host cells. Legionella causes deadly pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. A novel ubiquitination mechanism explains pathogenic effects of Legionella infection. First results hint towards a broader role in regulating many life processes.