Environment

  • Call for Paper – Panacea Green Infrastructure?

    ILS - Institut für Landes- und Stadtentwicklungsforschung

    The international conference addresses the multiple functions of green infrastructure in the sustainable transformation of cities. It aims to critically reflect the planning and implementation of green infrastructure in cities and regions across Europe. Particular attention is paid to the long-term management of green infrastructure against the background of recent economic trends in spatial development on the one hand, and new approaches of participation and empowerment on the other. Thus, the conference aims to introduce the concept of green infrastructure into political debates based on a critical review of conceptual discussions as well as planning practice.

  • Heating and cooling with environmental energy

    The technical centre “Gebäude G” at the Biberach University of Applied Sciences. Different types of TABS are built-in here. The building is used for research and teaching.   © Hochschule Biberach. Institut für Gebäude- und Energiesysteme, Stefan Sättele

    Environmental energy provides an efficient way to supply energy to non-residential buildings such as office and administration buildings, educational and recreational facilities as well as industrial sheds. The buildings can be efficiently heated and cooled using the combined use of thermo-active building systems and heat pumps. Across 24 pages, the new BINE-Themeninfo brochure entitled "Efficiently heating & cooling non-residential buildings" (II/2016) presents low-exergy concepts for these buildings.

  • Tackling remaining cost drivers in wind energy

    Expected reductions in electricity generation costs of wind energy 2020, 2030 and 2050; median of the “Best Guess" scenario from the expert survey Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory / IEA Wind Task 26

    Scientists at Fraunhofer IWES in Kassel aim to contribute to further cost reductions in wind energy use. They will present results of an large scale expert survey on future cost reduction potential, a simulation model on the failure characteristics of wind turbines and recommended practices for reliability data including an own seminar at the Wind Europe Summit 2016 in Hamburg, the world's largest wind energy event.

  • Tailor-Made Membranes for the Environment

    Transmission electron microscope image of the membrane, provided by the Ernst Ruska-Centre. The two phases for proton and electron conduction are marked in colour. Forschungszentrum Jülich

    Jülich, 30 November 2016 – The combustion of fossil energy carriers in coal and gas power plants produces waste gases that are harmful to the environment. Jülich researchers are working on methods to not only reduce such gases, but also utilize them. They are developing ceramic membranes with which pure hydrogen can be separated from carbon dioxide and water vapour. The hydrogen can then be used as a clean energy carrier, for example in fuel cells. The researchers have now been able to increase the efficiency of these membranes to an unprecedented level. Their research results were published in Scientific Reports.

  • The energy-saving data glasses

    Fraunhofer researchers have developed an energy-saving display that reduces the power consumption to a fraction. © Fraunhofer FEP, Photographer: Anna Schroll

    Data glasses mirror information to the eye without interfering with the wearer‘s vision. However, the battery runs down quickly, because the electronics consume a great amount of electricity while playing back the images. Fraunhofer researchers have developed an energy-saving display that reduces the power consumption to a fraction. The new display will be presented at the electronica trade fair in Munich from November 08-11, 2016.

  • Worrying traces of resistant bacteria in air

    Two photos taken in the same location in Beijing in August 2005. The photograph on the left was taken after it had rained for two days. The right photograph shows smog covering Beijing in what would otherwise be a sunny day.

    Polluted city air has now been identified as a possible means of transmission for resistant bacteria. Researchers in Gothenburg have shown that air samples from Beijing contain DNA from genes that make bacteria resistant to the most powerful antibiotics we have. “This may be a more important means of transmission than previously thought,” says Joakim Larsson, a professor at Sahlgrenska Academy and director of the Centre for Antibiotic Resistance Research at the University of Gothenburg.