Diabetes

  • Diabetes: Risk Factor Air Pollution

    Modelled PM 2.5 concentration in the Augsburg area.   Source: Helmholtz Zentrum München using data of GeoBasis-DE / BKG 2016

    Exposure to air pollution at the place of residence increases the risk of developing insulin resistance as a pre-diabetic state of type 2 diabetes. Scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München, in collaboration with colleagues of the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), reported these results in the journal ‘Diabetes’.

  • Diabetesforschung: Neuer Mechanismus zur Regulation des Insulin-Stoffwechsels gefunden

    Die Abbildung zeigt das isolierte Nervensystem einer Drosophila Larve. Farblich markiert sind die Kerne jener Zellen, die das untersuchte Enzym produzieren. Foto: Universität Osnabrück

    OSNABRÜCK/KOPENHAGEN.- Insulin stellt ein für alle Wirbeltiere lebensnotwendiges Hormon dar, da es unter anderem die Körperzellen anregt, Glukose aus dem Blut aufzunehmen und somit den Blutzuckerspiegel zu senken. Eine fehlerhafte Regulation des Insulin-Stoffwechsels führt zu vielfältigen Krankheiten, wobei Diabetes die weltweit größte Verbreitung aufweist. Basierend auf dieser hohen medizinischen Relevanz arbeiten international zahlreiche Forschergruppen daran, Faktoren zu identifizieren, die den Insulin-Stoffwechsel regulieren. So auch an der Universität Osnabrück.

  • How Does Friendly Fire Happen in the Pancreas?

    Treatment with an antagomir directed against miR92a results in reduced attacks of immune cells (green) on the insulin (white) producing beta cells directly in the pancreas. Moreover, the treatment leads to more regulatory T cells (red) able to protect the beta cells. Source: Helmholtz Zentrum München

    In type 1 diabetes, the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München, partner in the German Center for Diabetes Research, and their colleagues at Technical University of Munich have now reported in the journal ‘PNAS’ about a mechanism used by the immune system to prepare for this attack. They were able to inhibit this process through targeted intervention and are now hoping this will lead to new possibilities for treatment.

  • Internet Portal for Telemedicine Programs Aiming to Change Patients' Lifestyles

    Telemedicine Consult

    At Medica 2016, SYMILA, the Fraunhofer Application Center at Hamm, will demo a telemedicine Internet portal for diabetics, which was implemented on behalf of DITG – Deutsches Institut für Telemedizin und Gesundheitsförderung. The portal, centerpiece of an E-Health intervention system, collects and evaluates the data from telemedicine devices and lets DITG coaches address each patient based on information about her/his current situation. The system satisfies the requirements for a “Medical Data Space (MedDS)” that guarantees a secure exchange of medical data, as specified by the Fraunhofer initiative “Industrial Data Space (IDS)”. Meet the Fraunhofer experts: Booth 10 / G05.

  • New weapon against Diabetes

    Diagram of a HEK-beta cell. Graphics: ETH Zurich

    ETH Researchers have used the simplest approach yet to produce artificial beta cells from human kidney cells. Like their natural model, the artificial cells act as both sugar sensors and insulin producers. Researchers led by ETH Professor Martin Fussenegger at the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering (D-BSSE) in Basel have produced artificial beta cells using a straightforward engineering approach. The artificial beta cells can do everything that natural ones do: they measure the glucose concentration in the blood and produce enough insulin to effectively lower the blood sugar level. The ETH researchers presented their development in the latest edition of the journal Science.

  • Proteins as an early warning system for type 1 diabetes?

    Please find the caption in the text.

    Certain proteins in the blood of children can predict incipient type 1 diabetes, even before the first symptoms appear. A team of scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, partners in the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), reported these findings in the ‘Diabetologia’ journal. The work was based on two large studies that are intended to explain the mechanisms behind the development of type 1 diabetes (BABYDIAB and BABYDIET*). The study participants are children who have a first-degree relative with type 1 diabetes and who consequently have an increased risk of developing the disease due to the familial predisposition.

  • Researchers Discover New Regulator in Glucose Metabolism

    Immunofluorescence microscopy of TSC22D4 (red) expressing cells. Source: Helmholtz Zentrum München

    A key genetic switch in the liver regulates glucose metabolism and insulin action in other organs of the body. Researchers of Helmholtz Zentrum München, in collaboration with colleagues of the Heidelberg University Hospital, Technische Universität München and the Medical Faculty of the University of Leipzig, have now reported these findings in the journal ‘Nature Communications’. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that has become increasingly prevalent in the population: More than six million people are affected by the disease alone in Germany. It is characterized by a disruption of the glucose metabolism and (except for type 1 diabetes) an impaired response of the body to the hormone insulin. Scientists are currently seeking to find the cause and possible regulators of the disease in order to intervene therapeutically.

  • When fat cells change their colour

    The Freiburg researchers selectively ablated Lsd1 and inactivated its catalytic activity in brown adipocytes, which triggered a profound whitening of brown adipose tissue.

    The epigenetic enzyme Lsd1 plays an important role in maintaining brown fat tissue. In mammals, three types of adipose tissues exist. White adipocytes are mainly located in the abdominal and subcutaneous areas of the body and highly adapted to store excess energy. Conversely, beige and brown adipocytes are highly energy-expending by generating heat. A team with the Freiburg researchers Prof. Dr. Roland Schuele and Dr. Delphine Duteil has now shown that the epigenetic enzyme lysine-specific demethylase 1 (Lsd1) plays a key role in maintaining the metabolic properties of brown fat.