Electrons

  • Applying electron beams to 3-D objects

    Electron exit window and robotic handling for applying electron beams over three dimensions © Fraunhofer FEP, Photographer: Jürgen Lösel

    The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP now has the technological means of applying electron beams very flexible to 3-D objects through use of its new electron wand of the Swiss company ebeam by COMET.

  • Cooling towards absolute zero using super-heavy electrons

    Temperature evolution of an Yb0.81Sc0.19Co2Zn20 single crystal during the reduction of a magnetic field from 8 to 0 Tesla. © University of Augsburg, IFP/EP VI

    New quantum material significantly improves adiabatic demagnetization cooling

  • Countdown to the space mission “Solar Orbiter”: Measuring instruments from Kiel start their voyage

    The three sensors from Kiel are ready for space: EPT-HET1 and 2 on the left, and STEP on the right. Photo/Copyright: Jürgen Haacks, CAU

    Around five years ago, a team led by a physicist from Kiel University, Professor Robert Wimmer-Schweingruber, won the coveted tender for providing instruments to be placed on board the “Solar Orbiter” space probe. This joint mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the US space agency NASA is expected to launch in October 2018, and will go closer to the sun than has ever been done before. Now, exactly on schedule, the preparations in Kiel for this mission are entering their final phase. On Monday 21 November the flight instruments from Kiel will be handed over to the space probe installation team in England.

  • Defects at the spinterface disrupt transmission

    An organic radical approaches a lattice of rutile crystals (red) – here with an ideal surface free of defects Graphic: Benedetta Casu and Arrigo Calzolari

    Tübingen researchers put metal-oxides and organic magnets together; applications for electronics in sight

  • Manipulation of the characteristics of magnetic materials

    In the simulation, magnetic signals spread along the domain walls in a few nanoseconds. The signals behave in a wave-like manner, with the initially high amplitude rapidly becoming smaller. McCord

    Magnets are not everywhere equally magnetized, but automatically split up into smaller areas, so-called magnetic domains. The walls between the domains are of particular importance: they determine the magnetic properties of the material. A research team of material scientists from Kiel University is working on artificially creating domain walls to be able to modify in a controlled way the behaviour of magnets on a nanometre scale. In the long term, this method could also be used for high-speed and energy-efficient data transfer. The research results were recently published in the renowned journal “Scientific Reports”.

  • Matter-antimatter symmetry confirmed with precision record

    Sketch of the experimental setup used at CERN for the determination of the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio. Graphic: Masaki Hori

    CERN experiment sets precision record in the measurement of the antiproton to electron mass ratio using a new innovative cooling technique. According to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics, to each particle exists an antiparticle that is supposed to behave exactly the same way. Thus, “anti-people” in an “anti-world” would observe the same laws of physics, or make the same experiences in general, as we do. This postulate is, however, difficult to prove, since it is almost impossible to perform measurements on antimatter: whenever an antiparticle meets is matter-counterpart, both particles annihilate, accompanied by the creation of energy.

  • Mit Elektronenstrahlen Keime abtöten

    Probe eines Schweineherzbeutels © Fraunhofer FEP

    Medizinprodukte, Verpackungen und Lebensmittel lassen sich sicher und effizient durch Elektronenstrahlen sterilisieren. Fraunhofer-Forscher wollen künftig mit beschleunigten Elektronen auch Gewebetransplantate von Keimen befreien und zudem die Eigenschaften des biologischen Materials verändern.

  • New procedure for producing safe and more effective vaccines

    Foto Fraunhofer FEP

    A consortium of four Fraunhofer Institutes (the Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology IZI, Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation IPA, and the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB) is developing a way of inactivating viruses and other pathogens based on low energy electron irradiation. This may aid the manufacture of more effective, safe and also more cost-effective vaccines.

  • Observing the birth of a spectral line

    Absorption in a helium as it depends on the photon energy of the exciting extreme-ultraviolet flash of light and the time delay to the ionizing near-infrared laser pulse acting as a cut-off gate. graphics: MPIK

    Ultrashort intense laser pulses cut into a fundamental quantum phenomenon.
    For the first time, physicists managed to observe in real time how an atomic spectral line emerges within the incredibly short time span of a few femtoseconds, verifying a theoretical prediction. This has been possible by applying a very fast temporal switch: An intense laser pulse cuts off the natural decay shortly after excitation by a preceding laser pulse. The build-up of the asymmetric Fano line shape of two quantum-mechanically interfering electrons in the Helium atom is measured by varying the time delay between the two laser pulses.

  • Scientists shrink electron gun to matchbox size

    A miniature electron gun driven by Terahertz radiation: An ultraviolett pulse (blue) back-illuminates the gun photocathode, producing a high density electron bunch inside the gun. The bunch is immediately accelerated by ultra-intense single cycle Terahertz pulses to energies approaching one kilo-electronvolt (keV). These high-field optically-driven electron guns can be utilized for ultrafast electron diffraction or injected into the accelerators for X-ray light sources. Credit: W. Ronny Huang, CFEL/DESY/MIT

    Terahertz technology has the potential to enable new applications.In a multi-national effort, an interdisciplinary team of researchers from DESY and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has built a new kind of electron gun that is just about the size of a matchbox. Electron guns are used in science to generate high-quality beams of electrons for the investigation of various materials, from biomolecules to superconductors. They are also the electron source for linear particle accelerators driving X-ray free-electron lasers.

  • Tailor-Made Membranes for the Environment

    Transmission electron microscope image of the membrane, provided by the Ernst Ruska-Centre. The two phases for proton and electron conduction are marked in colour. Forschungszentrum Jülich

    Jülich, 30 November 2016 – The combustion of fossil energy carriers in coal and gas power plants produces waste gases that are harmful to the environment. Jülich researchers are working on methods to not only reduce such gases, but also utilize them. They are developing ceramic membranes with which pure hydrogen can be separated from carbon dioxide and water vapour. The hydrogen can then be used as a clean energy carrier, for example in fuel cells. The researchers have now been able to increase the efficiency of these membranes to an unprecedented level. Their research results were published in Scientific Reports.