Computer Science

  • #IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

    Computer science

    GESIS will host the 3rd annual International Conference on Computational Social Science (IC2S2). The conference has quickly grown into the premier venue specialized on the new field of computational social science. The conference features distinguished keynote speakers who attract attention beyond the borders of their individual research disciplines.

  • Computer in der Jacke, in der Brille und auf der Haut

    Leuchtende Fasern erzeugen wechselnde Tartan-Webmuster auf dem Kleidungsstück Bild: L. Fraguada/E. Bigger

    Computer sind ein wichtiges Werkzeug im Alltag, sei es als PC oder als Smartphone. In Zukunft werden sie zunehmend mit den Alltagsgegenständen verschmelzen und von dort aus den Nutzer unterstützen, etwa als Smartwatch, Displaybrillen, Sensorkleidung und vieles mehr. Über diesen Trend der Digitalisierung tauschen sich Wissenschaftler, Unternehmer, Modedesigner und Nutzer auf der vom KIT mitorganisierten Konferenz ISWC/UBICOMP vom 12. bis 16. September 2016 in Heidelberg aus. Vertreter der Medien sind herzlich eingeladen. Anmeldung bitte mit beigefügtem Formular oder per E-Mail.

  • Computers Made of Genetic Material? - ZDR researchers conduct electricity using DNA-based nanowires

    Scientists at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf conducted electricity through DNA-based nanowires by placing gold-plated nanoparticles on them.

    Tinier than the AIDS virus – that is currently the circumference of the smallest transistors. The industry has shrunk the central elements of their computer chips to fourteen nanometers in the last sixty years. Conventional methods, however, are hitting physical boundaries. An alternative could be the self-organization of complex components from molecules and atoms. Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Paderborn University have now made an important advance: the physicists conducted a current through gold-plated nanowires, which independently assembled themselves from single DNA strands. Their results have been published in the scientific journal Langmuir.

  • Enough is enough - stem cell factor Nanog knows when to slow down

    STILT generates simulated protein expression of dividing cells based on measured data and a dynamic model. Source: Helmholtz Zentrum München

    The transcription factor Nanog plays a crucial role in the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. Previously unclear was how its protein abundance is regulated in the cells. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich, working in collaboration with colleagues from ETH Zürich, now report in ‘Cell Systems’ that the more Nanog there is on hand, the less reproduction there is. Every stem cell researcher knows the protein Nanog* because it ensures that these all-rounders continue to renew. A controversial debate revolved around how the quantity of Nanog protein in the cell is regulated.

  • Humboldt Fellowship for research on tunable optical surfaces for Terahertz technology

    Dr. Corey Shemelya. Thomas Koziel/TU Kaiserslautern

    U.S. scientist Dr. Corey Shemelya has recently started a research stay at the University of Kaiserslautern in the form of a fellowship granted by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. Dr. Shemelya is studying structured optical surfaces which hold potential applications in communication technology and Terahertz imaging, e.g. body scanning equipment for airport safety. Shemelya is working in conjunction with the Terahertz Technology Laboratory of Professor Marco Rahm at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the State Research Center for Optical and Material Sciences (OPTIMAS).

  • Immune system reactions elucidated by mathematics

    Bacteria of the species Streptococcus pneumoniae colonising an endothelial cell. HZI/M. Rohde

    Using computer-based simulations and mouse experiments, HZI researchers disentangled the effects of proinflammatory signaling molecules on the post-influenza susceptibility to pneumococcal coinfection. A body infected by the influenza virus is particularly susceptible to other pathogens. Bacteria like Streptococcus pneumoniae, i.e. the pathogen causing pneumonia, find it easy to attack an influenza-modulated immune system and to spread widely. This can even be fatal in some cases. The reasons for the bacterial growth in the presence of a coinfection by influenza virus and bacteria is still debatable.

  • New Quantum States for Better Quantum Memories

    An artificial diamond under the optical microscope. The diamond fluoresces because due to a number of nitrogen defects. TU Wien

    How can quantum information be stored as long as possible? An important step forward in the development of quantum memories has been achieved by a research team of TU Wien. Conventional memories used in today’s computers only differentiate between the bit values 0 and 1. In quantum physics, however, arbitrary superpositions of these two states are possible. Most of the ideas for new quantum technology devices rely on this “Superposition Principle”. One of the main challenges in using such states is that they are usually short-lived. Only for a short period of time can information be read out of quantum memories reliably, after that it is irrecoverable.

  • Secure networks for the Internet of the future

    Security in large data centres: This goal is being pursued by the european research project SENDATE.

    Two new projects at the University of Würzburg's Institute of Computer Science receive nearly EUR 750,000 worth of funding. The institute is working to make secure and efficient networks for the Internet of the future happen.