Open Source Software

Free and Open Source Software, also known as FOSS, refers to software’s which were development to be distributed without a license. Meaning that anyone can use the software without buying a license. Examples of these software’s are VLC Media player, Mozilla Firefox, Linux OS, and Wikipedia. FOSS and Open Source Hardware (OSH) are part of the open-source movement.

  • Enough is enough - stem cell factor Nanog knows when to slow down

    STILT generates simulated protein expression of dividing cells based on measured data and a dynamic model. Source: Helmholtz Zentrum München

    The transcription factor Nanog plays a crucial role in the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. Previously unclear was how its protein abundance is regulated in the cells. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich, working in collaboration with colleagues from ETH Zürich, now report in ‘Cell Systems’ that the more Nanog there is on hand, the less reproduction there is. Every stem cell researcher knows the protein Nanog* because it ensures that these all-rounders continue to renew. A controversial debate revolved around how the quantity of Nanog protein in the cell is regulated.

  • Fraunhofer IISB releases foxBMS, a universal, royalty free and fully open battery management system

    Fraunhofer IISB is proud to announce the launch of its first generation, free, open, and flexible battery management system, namely foxBMS. At the conference “Batterietagung 2016” (battery-power.eu) foxBMS will be presented publicly for the first time. Visit us at Batterietagung 2016 on April 25-27 in Muenster, Germany, at the Fraunhofer Battery Alliance stand (booth 18). foxBMS will also be on show at the Fraunhofer IISB stand at the PCIM Europe 2016 from May 10-12 in Nuremberg, Germany. Currently, a total of 15 renowned industrial and research organizations from 7 countries worldwide have been selected from a long list of volunteers to participate in an intensive beta testing program.

  • Neue, offene Software für hochauflösende Mikroskopie

    Bielefelder Physiker berichten in „Nature Communications“ über ihre Neuentwicklung