Near field optics

Near Field Optics is a method used in nanotechnology to study localized light-matter interactions and to visualize fields confined to a surface, such as waveguide modes, surfaces polaritons and electromagnetic waves that propagate at the interface between two media.
In contrast with ordinary optics, where an object is normally irradiated by a light source and the scattered or emitted light is recorded by a detector, in near field optics, an object is split into two parts; the probe and the sample. The probe is normally engineerd to exploit the unique properties of metal nanostructures at optical frequencies to localize incident radiation and enhace the light-matter interaction with the sample.

This technique assisted the development of nanoplasmonics and single-molecule spectroscopy among others.

  • Ultrashort and Extremely Precise

    Innsbruck physicists observe a surprising quantum effect when short light pulses interact with matter. Patrick Maurer

    A group of theoretical physicists headed by Oriol Romero-Isart from the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information and the University of Innsbruck observes a surprising quantum effect when short light pulses interact with matter. In the future, this effect may be used for developing a completely new type of far-field light nanoscopes.